Montana State University

Extended University Workforce and Professional Development Course Catalog

The Office of Continuing Education at Extended University offers both face-to-face and online learning opportunities:

  • Degree Programs
  • Certificate Programs
  • Professional Development
  • Summer Field Study Programs
  • Study Abroad
  • Leisure and Lifelong Learning
  • Youth Programs


The courses below have been offered in the past three years. Also see our current courses open for registration.

Engineering

ECIV 505: Quality Assurance and Risk Management in Construction

Financial Planning

EDCI 588: Applying Common Core Classroom Applications: 2016 Workshop
HDFP 510: Fundamentals for Family Financial Planning
HDFP 515: Insurance Planning for Families
HDFP 520: Investing for the Families Future (FALL)
HDFP 520: Investing for the Families Future (SUMMER)
HDFP 525: Retirement Planning, Employee Benefits, and the Family
HDFP 530: Estate Planning for Families
HDFP 540: Personal Income Taxation
HDFP 540: Personal Income Taxation (SUMMER)
HDFP 545: Financial Theory & Research I
HDFP 555: Financial Counseling
HDFP 560: Professional Practices in Family Financial Planning
HDFP 572: Financial Planning - Case Studies
HDFP 572: Financial Planning - Case Studies (FALL)
HDFP 575: Professional Paper (SPRING)
HDFP 575: Professional Paper (SUMMER)

K-12 Teaching

AGED 588: Professional Development for Montana Agricultural Educators
BIOL 591: Plant Science: It Grows on You
BIOL 591: Teaching Evolution
BIOL 591: Using Local Ecosystems to Implement Biology Activities in the Classroom
BIOL 591: Anatomy & Physiology
CHMY 591: An Atoms-First Primer for AP/IB Chemistry Teachers
CHMY 591: Exploring Chemistry
CHMY 591: Exploring Organic Chemistry for Teachers
CHMY 591: Chemistry of the Environment: Water, Air, and Earth
CHMY 591: Exploring Biochemistry I
CHMY 594: Science Lab Safety and Risk Management
ERTH 516: Northern Rocky Mountain Geology
ERTH 520: Fundamentals of Oceanography for Teachers
ERTH 522: Teaching Middle School Earth System Science
ERTH 524: K-14 Earth System Science
ERTH 528: Understanding Climate Change for Teachers
ERTH 588: Earth Science and Me
ERTH 591: Geology of the Moon
ERTH 591: Geology of Glacier National Park
ERTH 591: Landforms for Elementary Teachers
ERTH 591: Historical Geology for Educators
ERTH 591: K-14 Earth System Science(Summer)
ERTH 591: Weather and Climate for Teachers
ERTH 594: Geology Seminar: Geology of Mars
BIOE 513: Terrestrial Ecology of Plains and Prairies
BIOE 519: Biology of Riparian Zones and Wetlands
BIOE 520: Understanding and Managing Animal Biodiversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
BIOE 522: Birds of Prey of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
BIOE 523: Wildlife Ecology of Northern Rocky Mountains
BIOE 591: Ecology & Conservation of the World's Marine Ecosystems - An Online Course for Teachers
BIOE 591: Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
BIOE 591: Alpine Ecology
EDCI 504: 802: 803: 804: Assessment and Evaluation in Education
EDCI 509: 802: 803: 804: Implementing Action Research in Teaching and Learning
EDCI 537: Contemporary Issues in Science Education
EDCI 540: American Indian Studies for Educators
EDCI 552: Human Development and the Psychology of Learning
EDCI 553: Diversity, Special Needs, and Classroom Discipline
EDCI 554: Curriculum Design, Pedagogy and Assessment (EARLY SUMMER 2015)
EDCI 554: Curriculum Design, Pedagogy and Assessment (LATE SUMMER 2015)
EDCI 555: Technology, Instructional Design, and Learner Success
EDCI 556: 802: The Legal, Social and Practical Basis of Schooling
EDCI 557: 802: Brain Science, Educational Research, and Teaching
EDCI 558: 802: Internship I: Methods of Teaching
EDCI 559: 802: Internship II - Equity, Special Needs and Diversity
EDCI 564: The Comprehensive Portfolio
EDCI 575: Professional Capstone Paper & Symposium in Science Education
EDCI 577: OPI Internship-Teacher Certification
EDCI 588: Supervision of Student Teachers
EDCI 588: 2017 MBI Summer Institute: Achieving Student Success with the Montana Behavioral Initiative Model
EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Fall Ecological Field Studies
EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Summer Ecological Field Studies
EDCI 591: Project Archaeology - Investigating a Plains Tipi
EDCI 591: Comparative International Education
EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Winter Ecological Field Studies
EDCI 591: History of Spaceflight and Space Technology
EDCI 591: Symbiosis - Eat, Prey, and Love
EDCI 598: NPTT Internship: Student Teaching
EDCI 598: NPTT Internship: Paid Internship
EDLD 507: Foundations of Educational Leadership
EDLD 515: Planned Change
EDLD 526: Evaluation of School Programs
EDLD 555: Montana School Finance
EDLD 565: K-12 Instructional Leadership
EDLD 620: The School Superintendent
EDLD 645: Personnel Management in Education
EDLD 650: Montana Finance and Facilities
EDLD 655: Montana Legal and Policy Studies
EELE 591: Solar Cell Basics for Science Teachers
ENTO 510: Insect Ecology
GEO 521: Dinosaur Paleontology I
GEO 522: Dinosaur Paleontology II
LRES 557: Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park
LRES 569: Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem
LRES 582: Streamside Science: Hands-On Approaches to Water Quality Education
LRES 583: The Dirt on Soil Science for Elementary Teachers
LRES 584: The Twelve Principles of Soil Science
LRES 585: Water Quality in the Classroom for Teachers
LRES 591: Lake Ecology
MSSE 501: Inquiry through Science & Engineering Practices
MSSE 591: Web Tools for Teaching Science
MSSE 591: Capstone Data Analysis
MSSE 591: Framework for Science Education
M 517: Modeling in a STEM World
M 518: Statistics for Teachers
MB 536: Exploring Microbiology
MB 539: Infection and Immunity
MB 540: Environmental Microbiology
MB 541: Microbial Genetics
MB 542: Microbial Ecology
MB 547: Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park
MB 591: Project Microbe
NASX 530: Federal Indian Law and Policy
Art and Literacy in the Science Classroom
Next Generation of Science Standards For the Classroom
Taking Next Generation Science Standards to your Classroom
NUTR 526: Nutrition for Fitness and Performance
PHSX 401: Physics by Inquiry I
PHSX 403: Physics by Inquiry III
PHSX 405: Special Relativity
PHSX 491: Conceptual Physics
PHSX 511: Astronomy for Teachers
PHSX 511: Astronomy for SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors
PHSX 512: General Relativity
PHSX 513: Quantum Mechanics
PHSX 514: Comparative Planetology: Establishing a Virtual Presence in the Solar System
PHSX 582: Astrobiology for Teachers
PHSX 591: Electric Circuits & Magnetism
PHSX 591: Teaching and Learning in Science: Elementary Space Science
PHSX 591: The Science of Sound
PHSX 591: Physics of Renewable Energy for Secondary Teachers
PHSX 591: Teaching Electricity and Magnetism Using Research-Based Curriculum
PHSX 591: The World of Motion
PHSX 591: World of Force
PSPP 548: Flowering Plants of the Northern Rocky Mountains
PSPP 591: Plants, People, and Health

Library Media

EDCI 545: Organization of Information in School Library Media Centers
EDCI 546: The School Library Media Specialist
EDCI 547: Information Inquiry and Educational Change
EDCI 548: Management of Information and Resources
EDCI 598: Internship in Library Media

Medicine and Healthcare

SPNS 250: Spanish for Healthcare Professionals

Mental Health

AC 501: Chemical Dependency Counseling
AC 502: Psychopharmacology and Addictions
AC 503: Assessment, Treatment Planning of Addiction Counseling
AC 504: Alcohol and Drug Studies
AC 505: Cross-Cultural & Ethical Considerations in Addictions Counseling
AC 506: Group Counseling in Addiction Settings
AC 507: Group Counseling in Addiction Settings II
AC 508: Counseling Theories in Addiction Settings
AC 509: Assessment & Treatment Planning in Addictions II
AC 510: Chemical Dependency Counseling II

ECIV 505: Quality Assurance and Risk Management in Construction

Credits: 3

In-state students please register using CRN 11340
Out-of-state students please register using CRN 11528

This course addresses the implementation of Quality Assurance and Risk Management principles on a construction project. The student will become familiar with the fundamentals of Construction Quality Management (CQM) and how those fundamentals are used proactively to successfully complete a construction project. After developing a solid foundation in CQM, the student will then develop an understanding of the risk components that factor into completing a comprehensive Risk Assessment of a construction project.

By the end of the course successful students will:
  • Use a complete set of Contract Documents from an actual construction project to develop a Quality Control Plan and a comprehensive Risk Management Plan for the project.
  • Understand the principles of Project Partnering.
  • Understand the difference between the macro (project assessment) and micro (day-to-day jobsite management) components of construction project risk.
  • Use Earned Value principles to assess the technical, schedule, and cost risk elements of a construction project.
  • Understand the management decisions that have historically contributed to the failure of construction contractors.
  • Understand how contractors proactively manage their business practices to be successful in a cyclical economy.
  • Understand the risk components inherent in the traditional construction contract clauses (using the Federal Acquisition Regulations).


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EDCI 588: Applying Common Core Classroom Applications: 2016 Workshop

Credits: 1

Please note that 588 courses are intended as professional development for practicing teachers and cannot be applied toward credit requirements for graduate degree programs.

This course is offered for Montana Small School Alliance Instructors at various schools across Montana. Students will be exposed to a variety of activity-based strategies aligned with Common Core Standards. Based on the particular seminars attended, instructors will choose a discipline to focus on and identify strategies that they will take back to their classrooms to implement.

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HDFP 510: Fundamentals for Family Financial Planning

Credits: 3

Issues and concepts related to the overall financial planning process, and establishing client-planner relationships. Services provided, documentation required and client and CFP licensee responsibilities are explored. Competencies related to gathering of client data, determining goals and expectations, and assessing the client's financial status by analyzing and evaluating data are developed. Emerging issues and the role of ethics in financial planning are an integral part of the course.

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HDFP 515: Insurance Planning for Families

Credits: 3

An in-depth study of risk management concepts, tools, and strategies for individuals and families, including: life insurance; property and casualty insurance; liability insurance; accident, disability, health, and long-term case insurance; and government-subsidized programs. Current and emerging issues, as well as ethical consideration, relative to risk management will be discussed. Case studies provide experience in selecting insurance products suitable for individuals and families.

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HDFP 520: Investing for the Families Future (FALL)

Credits: 3

An in-depth study of investment options for families, this course will include common stocks, fixed income securities, convertible securities, and related choices. Relationship between investment options and employee/employer benefit plan choices will be studied. Current and emerging issues, and ethics will be an integral part of the course.

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HDFP 520: Investing for the Families Future (SUMMER)

Credits: 3

An in-depth study of investment options for families, this course will include common stocks, fixed income securities, convertible securities, and related choices. Relationship between investment options and employee/employer benefit plan choices will be studied. Current and emerging issues, and ethics will be an integral part of the course.

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HDFP 525: Retirement Planning, Employee Benefits, and the Family

Credits: 3

Micro and macro considerations in retirement planning for individuals and families will be covered. Included is a survey of various types of retirement plans, ethical consideration in providing retirement planning services, assessing and forecasting financial needs in retirement, integration of retirement plans with government benefits, and current research and theory in the field. Case studies will provide experience in retirement planning needs analysis.

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HDFP 530: Estate Planning for Families

Credits: 3

Fundamentals of the estate planning process, including estate settlement, estate and gift taxes, property ownership and transfer, and powers of appointment will be studied. Tools and techniques used in implementing an effective estate plan, ethical considerations in providing estate planning services, and new and emerging issues in the field will be explored. Case studies will provide experience in developing estate plans suitable for varied family forms.

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HDFP 540: Personal Income Taxation

Credits: 3

In-depth information of income tax practices and procedures including tax regulations, tax return preparation, the tax audit process, the appeals process, preparation for an administrative or judicial forum, and ethical considerations of taxation. New and emerging issues related to taxation will be covered. Family / individual case studies provide practice in applying and analyzing tax information and recommending appropriate tax strategies.

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HDFP 540: Personal Income Taxation (SUMMER)

Credits: 3

In-depth information of income tax practices and procedures including tax regulations, tax return preparation, the tax audit process, the appeals process, preparation for an administrative or judicial forum, and ethical considerations of taxation. New and emerging issues related to taxation will be covered. Family / individual case studies provide practice in applying and analyzing tax information and recommending appropriate tax strategies.

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HDFP 545: Financial Theory & Research I

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the social science of family relationships as they relate to the processes of family finance and financial planning. The course will cover the theories of family functioning, microeconomic theory related to family resource allocation decisions, the family as an economic unit, and the interaction of the economy and families.

Course Objective:
The student will:
  • Be introduced to the processes of creating knowledge in concepts of family financial planning through research.
    • Understand the scientific research process.
    • Identify the role of theory in research.
    • Understand that knowledge is created through qualitative and quantitative analysis of data.
  • Be able to read research articles with an introductory level of understanding.
  • Identify and explain various theories of family functioning, family development, family formation diversity, and the impacts of culture on family function.
  • Identify and explain various social sciences theories, with an emphasis on microeconomic theory and household economic behavior, which seek to explain and predict human behavior in decisions about resource allocation.
  • Apply theory and research to family financial planning.


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HDFP 555: Financial Counseling

Credits: 3

Theory and research regarding the interactive process between the clients and the practitioner, including communication techniques, motivation and esteem building, the counseling environment, ethics and methods of data intake, verification and analysis. Other topics include legal issues, compensation, uses of technology to identify resources, information management, and current or emerging issues.

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HDFP 560: Professional Practices in Family Financial Planning

Credits: 3

Challenges of managing financial planning practices including, but not limited to: business valuation, personnel, marketing, client services, ethics and technological applications. Relying both on a theoretical as well as an applied approach, students will analyze case studies that provide relevant, practical exposure to practice management issues, with a strong emphasis on current research findings.

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HDFP 572: Financial Planning - Case Studies

Credits: 3

All courses in the program must be completed as a prerequisite for enrolling in this course. Integration of both theoretical and applied concepts, including research findings from two comprehensive cases illustrating a students' understanding of a wide range of financial planning concepts and techniques as well as an awareness of ethical issues. A panel of faculty and Certified Financial Planners will review the two case studies.

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HDFP 572: Financial Planning - Case Studies (FALL)

Credits: 3

All courses in the program must be completed as a prerequisite for enrolling in this course. Integration of both theoretical and applied concepts, including research findings from two comprehensive cases illustrating a students' understanding of a wide range of financial planning concepts and techniques as well as an awareness of ethical issues. A panel of faculty and Certified Financial Planners will review the two case studies.

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HDFP 575: Professional Paper (SPRING)

Credits: 3

A research or professional paper or project dealing with a topic in the field. The topic must have been mutually agreed upon by the student and his or her major advisor and graduate committee.

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HDFP 575: Professional Paper (SUMMER)

Credits: 3

A research or professional paper or project dealing with a topic in the field. The topic must have been mutually agreed upon by the student and his or her major advisor and graduate committee.

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AGED 588: Professional Development for Montana Agricultural Educators

Credits: 2

Please note that 588 courses are intended as professional development for practicing teachers and cannot be applied toward credit requirements for graduate degree programs.

This course will focus on updated content and delivery methods for teaching secondary agricultural education in Montana. Participants are expected to attend all curriculum-related sessions of the MAAE Summer Update held in Red Lodge, and then prepare a unit plan related to one or more of the topics presented. The unit plan must fit seamlessly into the Montana agricultural education curriculum standards for agricultural education provided through the Montana Office of Public Instruction. Students will have additional time to complete and submit the unit plan.

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BIOL 591: Plant Science: It Grows on You

Credits: 1

Please register for CRN 11148
This course will look at familiar seeds and their early growth into seedlings (with experimentation with the seedlings). You will  grow the little mustard known as Brassica, the Wisconsin Fast Plant. It is called the fast plant because it goes from seed to seedling to mature plant with flowers and fruits, and back to seed, in six weeks. In order to get the plant to grow satisfactorily, you must have a grow-light (shipped as part of your  materials) that can be on 24/7 (24 hours a day all week) for the entire six weeks, and you must get the seeds planted on Day 0.
The goals of this course are to...

  • Watch seeds germinate
  • Learn about uptake of water in seeds
  • Think about seeds as food
  • Observe how plants respond to gravity
  • Learn the parts of a flower
  • Act like a pollinating bee
  • Watch a flower part turn into fruit with seeds

You will keep journals with growth data, answer questions from the instructor based on your journals and the manual, and participate in discussions. If you are already familiar with Wisconsin Fast Plants, you can either participate in this class with more experimentation with your plants.

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BIOL 591: Teaching Evolution

Credits: 3

Please register using CRN 25160
Evolution is a powerful and generative concept that is fundamental to a modern understanding of biology and the natural world. Evolution offers insight into how we came to be, what our future may hold, and how we interact with the living world. However, despite its centrality to modern biology, teaching evolution can be especially challenging. Unlike instruction on many other topics covered in pre-college biology courses (organ systems, cell structure, ecosystem interactions, etc.), evolution instruction may encounter unique sources of resistance and misinformation in addition to more typical misconceptions and teaching challenges.

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, teaching skills, and resources they need to teach evolution effectively. In this course, students will get an overview of evolutionary history and theory, an introduction to current topics of evolution research, tools for making evolution relevant to the science classroom and students' lives, and strategies for lesson development, as well as practical techniques and background knowledge for responding to challenges to evolution instruction.

Ultimately, of course, the goal of this course is to change how its students teach in their own science classrooms. We hope that participants in this course will increasingly emphasize evolution in their K-12 classrooms through dynamic and coherent lessons that help their students overcome misconceptions and see how evolution is relevant to their lives.

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BIOL 591: Using Local Ecosystems to Implement Biology Activities in the Classroom

Credits: 1

Please register using CRN 22835
In this six-week course you will be introduced to fundamental biological concepts involving the interaction of matter and energy that results in the change of ecosystems. Each week you will be assigned a biological activity that can be incorporated into the science classroom. Student learning will involve cognitive, skill and affective outcomes.

The goals of this course are to...

  1. Learn about the importance of abiotic and biotic factors influencing local ecosystems.
  2. Learn how plants change during the autumn.
    • Generate an autumn leaf and seed collection.

  3. Learn how insects impact and interact within ecosystems.
    • Learn how insects are impacted by pheromones.
    • Learn how termites can be used to study a micro-ecosystem.
    • Demonstrate how termites can be used to study pheromones.

  4. Assess the risk of pollution through the use of bioassays.
  5. Identify and research an invasive organism impacting your local ecosystem.


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BIOL 591: Anatomy & Physiology

Credits: 3

This course is designed for high school and post-secondary teachers of human anatomy and physiology and presumes the student already has a solid foundation in A&P. This course provides an introduction to the use of case studies as an effective way to integrate problem based learning into the human anatomy and physiology classroom. It is a methodology course designed for instructors who are already comfortable with fundamental physiological concepts. Students will review various physiological principles of the human body and then explore clinical applications of these principles via case studies. During the semester, students will participate in discussions regarding various physiological concepts, the use of case studies to improve student comprehension and build critical thinking skills, as well as critiques and modifications of presented case studies to help individuals build a collection of classroom-ready case studies. By semester’s end, each student will also develop an original case study for use in their high school or post-secondary A&P classroom.

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CHMY 591: An Atoms-First Primer for AP/IB Chemistry Teachers

Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce teachers of Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) Chemistry courses to an Atoms-First pedagogy in the teaching of their courses. The textbook and its ancillary materials will be used as the primary basis for the course although teachers will be required to utilize materials from various resources. Teachers will be exposed to the an Atoms-First approach to teaching AP or IB Chemistry which emphasizes a pedagogy of building chemical foundations before moving onto more difficult topics. Teachers will finish by developing lesson plans using this pedagogy to teach AP or IB Chemistry at the high school level. We will discuss how to best engage high school students in topics, classroom implementation practices and proposals, and lab exercises that support the teachings in the classroom. Teachers will develop and establish a plan to implement inquiry-based chemistry lessons that conform to an Atoms-First pedagogy.

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CHMY 591: Exploring Chemistry

Credits: 3

This course provides an in depth discussion of critical concepts in chemistry. Chemical principles will be presented in the context of real-world issues including energy production (biofuels), chemistry of water, and polymers. Additional emphasis will be placed on the role of experimental sciences in teaching reading, writing, and logical thinking across multiple student backgrounds. Appropriate student laboratory designs will be addressed.

This course is intended as a “gateway” for future online courses in chemistry for middle and high school teachers.

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CHMY 591: Exploring Organic Chemistry for Teachers

Credits: 3

This online course targets science teachers, Grades 6-12. The course will provide a general review/background in organic chemistry with an emphasis on functional groups and covalent chemistry reaction mechanisms while focusing on applications including polymers. Providing a solid foundation of basic principles of organic chemistry will allow teachers to describe and explain practical applications of organic chemistry.

A class discussion forum will be part of the course and allow teachers to share and explain teaching, demonstrations and lab activities from the course. In addition to on-line homework sets and exams, participants will also design a teaching project that uses course topics to develop an original teaching component to use in their own teaching setting. Participants will receive extra help with course topics through a chapter-by-chapter commentary. Where appropriate, emphasis will be on applications of organic chemistry to everyday life. This course provides background for future courses in biochemistry for middle and high school teachers.

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CHMY 591: Chemistry of the Environment: Water, Air, and Earth

Credits: 3

This course is designed to familiarize students with basic general science and chemistry concepts of the environment, including water, air and Earth - as well as to provide opportunities to enrich these chemistry concepts through applications and examples. Since this course will be building upon basic chemistry concepts, it is assumed that teachers taking this course have taken general chemistry at the undergraduate level, or the equivalent.

The course will integrate chemistry concepts of water, air and Earth with environmental context. Instructors will use narratives, supplemental reference book examples, internet examples, as well as material complied on the student’s part. The textbook will be used as a basis for the course but students will be required to utilize materials from various resources, including but not limited to: the Internet, local professionals and their own classroom materials. Students will complete two original curriculum teaching projects derived from course content, which are designed to complement existing classroom content.
    Students will be assessed through the following ways:
  • Weekly on-line discussions of a topic posed which is derived from the weekly narrative
  • Concise weekly homework questions derived from chemistry concepts explored in narratives and supplemental textbook
  • Final exam consisting of multiple-choice questions
  • The development of three complete and original curriculum projects derived from course content


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CHMY 591: Exploring Biochemistry I

Credits: 3

This course will consider the reactions of the principle biochemical molecules (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) with additional emphasis on biomedical topics. The primary goal of this course is to promote critical thinking about important, current health issues and to examine the role of laboratory modules in teaching these concepts. General biochemistry principles will be presented to understand the diseases under review. Written material will be provided on advanced topics.

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CHMY 594: Science Lab Safety and Risk Management

Credits: 1

This seminar provides information on safe school laboratory practices including protocols for chemical purchase, storage and disposal, as well as the use of personal safety equipment. Fire control procedures will be addressed including a hands-on fire extinguishing experience. Personal risk and liability will be discussed. Biological lab safety issues will also be considered.

Time Commitment: 8-10 hrs/day

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ERTH 516: Northern Rocky Mountain Geology

Credits: 2

This course will investigate the geological history and evolution of the Northern Rocky Mountain region. Topics to be covered will include local stratigraphy, the Laramide and Sevier orogenic events, volcanism in and around Yellowstone National Park, earthquake activity within the Intermountain Seismic Belt, and many more. Daily field trips from campus will provide “hands-on learning” in some of the best-exposed, classic geologic localities in the Rocky Mountains. The course will integrate many aspects of physical geology, historical geology, geomorphology, structural geology, seismology, volcanology, and tectonics in a manner that is relevant and applicable to the region surrounding Montana State University.

Physical fitness requirements:
In order to study the geology of the greater Yellowstone region in the field, this course will involve outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to hike in moderate mountainous terrain in order to accomplish course goals, namely hands-on field experience with geologic observations and interpretations. Interested students should contact Diana in the MSSE office to register for the course and to communicate their ability to meet the physical fitness requirements for the course. Please email Diana at dianap@montana.edu

Recommended field equipment:
  • Good hiking boots with ankle support
  • Day pack
  • Lunch, snacks, and lots of water (hydration system)
  • Rain gear and layers that can be added or shed, depending on fluctuating temperatures in the high alpine. Extra cloths (layers) for rapid changes in the weather
  • Field notebook (waterproof paper), pencils, pens, clipboard
  • Hat and sunscreen
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera
  • First aid kit
  • Hiking pole (ski pole or Leki walking pole)
Time Commitment: 8-10 hrs/day

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ERTH 520: Fundamentals of Oceanography for Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11768
Fundamentals of Oceanography offers an introduction to the physical, biological, chemical and geological processes of the ocean and its ecosystems. Teachers will learn about the complex interactions between these properties, their influence on terrestrial ecosystems and the impacts humans have on these processes. Exciting laboratory exercises can be adapted to be offered at any grade level.

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ERTH 522: Teaching Middle School Earth System Science

Credits: 3

CRN 35291
This course uses problem based learning to explore the events and interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. The middle school course is composed of 3 modules plus an introduction module. Teachers utilize problem based learning to study both event to sphere interactions as well as sphere to sphere interactions and how one interaction can lead to other interactions.

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ERTH 524: K-14 Earth System Science

Credits: 2

Please register for CRN 11139
Participants will learn to find the Internet's abundant digital Earth Systems Science (ESS) resources and use these resources to create integrated mathematics and science lessons. Participants will learn to adapt online resources to their own instructional environments at the K-14 levels.

ESS emphasizes the dynamic interrelationships among changes in the atmosphere, ocean circulation patterns, and environmental processes on and beneath the earth's surface. K-14 Earth System Science instruction is designed for K-14 teachers already familiar with using basic computer and Internet tools. Participants will integrate concepts from ESS with Internet resources, such as digital weather images, near-real-time earthquake data, and archived climate data. Necessary ESS scientific background is provided and effective pedagogical strategies are discussed for using computer technology with students at all levels K-14. Although the course science content is based in ESS, emphasis will be on the integration of mathematics, earth systems science, and Internet technology, using discovery and constructivist methods.

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ERTH 528: Understanding Climate Change for Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11690
The science of climate change is a complex subject that balances the physical record and scientific fact with politics, policy, and ethics. This course explores the science of climate change. Students will learn how the climate system works, what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact. We will also explore how climate has changed in the past and how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate. Finally we will examine the possible consequences of climate change for our planet. The course explores evidence for changes in land and ocean temperature, changes in the cryosphere, sea level and acidity change due to global warming. Students will learn how climate change today is different from past climate cycles and how satellites and other technologies are revealing the global signals of a changing climate. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential social, economic and environmental consequences of climate change.

In light of the changes we have already observed, and the projected future changes it is imperative that we equip our teacher and educators with the tools to better prepare and motivate the next generation of scientists in this field. In this course we will build an understanding of climate change and how it will impact our future.

The course goals for teachers in grades 9-12 are to:
  • Increase content knowledge about climate change,
  • Increase pedagogical skills related to teaching climate change topics,
  • Create a "tool-kit" of teaching activities relating to climate change, and
  • Engender changes in teacher-participants' classrooms that lead to an increased quantity and quality of climate change, weather and climate related instruction.
These goals are accomplished through a highly structured series of on-line lectures, web based activities using a range of on-line resources, and participant discussions on developing classroom activities. This course is specially designed for practicing science teachers at the upper middle to high school level.

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ERTH 588: Earth Science and Me

Credits: 2

Please note that 588 courses are intended as professional development for practicing teachers and cannot be applied toward credit requirements for graduate degree programs

This workshop will give teachers the tools they need to instruct their students on the importance of mining, minerals, and earth science. 18 topics will be covered including: the rock cycle, identifying minerals, the basics of plate tectonics, identifying a sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rock and ore, reading maps, cost of mining and Montana mining deposits. Teachers will also have the opportunity to tour the Yellowstone Talc Mine and the Three Forks Talc Mill.

Non-Credit Information
This offering allows participants in a non-credit course to earn academic credit. Please register for the course and academic credit separately. For more information on registering for the non-credit workshop contact Doug Scott at dougscott7603@outlook.com.



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ERTH 591: Geology of the Moon

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 22471
The Geology of the Moon on-line course is designed for practicing teachers who want to understand more about the Moon and its history and relationship to Earth. We will explore theories for its formation and the geologic processes involved in its evolution, including the differentiation of its layers, volcanic activity, and impact cratering, with each discussion encompassing comparisons between the Earth and Moon. We will investigate the Moon’s orbital characteristics (revolution, rotation, phases and eclipses) and explore current and upcoming missions to the Moon (the material will be connected to National Science Education Standards). During this course you will interactively participate through a combination of presentations, assigned readings, on-line discussions, classroom exercises and dynamic activities.

The instructor, Cassandra Runyon, has her PhD in Geology and has been working in the field for over 20 years. She is a member of the Science and Education and Public Outreach team for the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, or SSERVI, formerly NASA's Lunar Science Institute, and was a science team member and Education/Outreach lead for a recent mission to the Moon.

A special "thanks" to NASA's SSERVI for their support in the development of this course.

Participation in this course is limited to US teachers only, as we are not allowed to send some of the materials/equipment out of the U.S.

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ERTH 591: Geology of Glacier National Park

Credits: 2

This field course will focus on the geomorphology and history of glaciers, stratigraphy and the history preserved in the strata, structural geology and tectonic history, and other geo-topics as revealed by the wonderful outdoor laboratory in the vicinity of Glacier National Park. Daily hiking, tent camping and outdoor cooking will be the expectation.

Physical fitness requirements:
In order to study the field geology of Glacier National Park, this course will involve very strenuous outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to hike several miles at high elevations in rough, rocky, mountainous terrain in order to accomplish course goals, namely hands-on field experience with geologic observations and interpretations. To assure that all students will have the full benefit of the program, please contact the MSSE Office before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet the expectations of this course. If you require an accommodation because of a disability, please contact the MSSE Office.

Recommended field equipment:
  • Good hiking boots with ankle support
  • Backpack
  • Water bottles or a pack hydration system
  • Rain gear and layers that can be added or shed, depending on fluctuating temperatures in the mountains
  • Field notebook (waterproof paper), pencils, pens, clipboard
  • Hat and sunscreen
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera
  • Small first aid kit
  • Hiking pole (ski pole or Leki walking pole)
  • Tent, sleeping bag and pad, personal overnight camping items
  • Swim trunks and something to protect your feet in water
  • Limited cooking gear (we will restock food on a daily basis)

Time Commitment: 10-12 hrs/day

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ERTH 591: Landforms for Elementary Teachers

Credits: 1

Please register for CRN 22472
In this online course we will investigate landform science. Observing landforms and how they change is fun! We will look at a variety of landscapes and how they came to look like they do. We will model landforms and encourage sharing and discussions of teaching ideas in our course. The principles you learn will increase your confidence in teaching science in general as well as landforms in particular.

The goals of this course are to...

  • Introduce concepts of structure, process and time
  • Review the battle between living and non-living forces and the relationship it has to landforms
  • Model and represent landforms using resources such as remote sensing, maps, physical models and math models
  • Uncover the importance of orders of landforms
  • Distinguish between continent and ocean basin movement versus minor slope elements
  • Compare and contrast varying degrees of arid regions
  • Classify volcanic landforms by their composition
  • Compare and contrast varying degrees of water erosion regions
  • Identify landscapes formed by landslides and glaciers
  • Incorporate a Native American perspective on Landform Science


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ERTH 591: Historical Geology for Educators

Credits: 3

This course will provide grade 7-12 science teachers with a rigorous overview of the evolution of the Earth and life, and the methods that geologists use to investigate the history of our planet. The content of this course will be supplemented by reading scientific and popular literature and a focus on the pedagogy of teaching concepts of evolution and geologic time to middle and high school students. This course is intended strictly for science teachers enrolled in the Masters of Science and Science Education degree program and other science teachers with a minimum of two years teaching experience.

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ERTH 591: K-14 Earth System Science(Summer)

Credits: 2

Participants will learn to find the Internet's abundant digital Earth Systems Science (ESS) resources and use these resources to create integrated mathematics and science lessons. Participants will learn to adapt online resources to their own instructional environments at the K-14 levels.

ESS emphasizes the dynamic interrelationships among changes in the atmosphere, ocean circulation patterns, and environmental processes on and beneath the earth's surface. K-14 Earth System Science instruction is designed for K-14 teachers already familiar with using basic computer and Internet tools. Participants will integrate concepts from ESS with Internet resources, such as digital weather images, near-real-time earthquake data, and archived climate data. Necessary ESS scientific background is provided and effective pedagogical strategies are discussed for using computer technology with students at all levels K-14. Although the course science content is based in ESS, emphasis will be on the integration of mathematics, earth systems science, and Internet technology, using discovery and constructivist methods.

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ERTH 591: Weather and Climate for Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 34861
Few subjects within Earth Sciences are as far reaching as the study of weather (meteorology) and climate (climatology). We plan our days based on the current weather, plant food supplies based on seasonal forecasts, and develop economies based on regional climate. Weather and climate also explain major biogeographic patterns and influence physical processes shaping Earth. With unprecedented climate changes likely inevitable in our lifetimes, the study of weather and climate has also taken on added importance in recent decades. For these reasons and many more, it is imperative that we equip our teacher and educators with the tools to better prepare and motivate the next generation of scientists in this field. In this course we will build a physical understanding of how Earth systems interact to create the weather we see on a daily basis and the climatic patterns that emerge at larger spatial and temporal scales.

The course goals are to:
  • Increase weather and climate content knowledge,
  • Increase pedagogical skills related to teaching weather and climate,
  • Create a "tool-kit" of teaching activities relating to weather and climate, and
  • Engender changes in teacher-participants' classrooms that lead to an increased quantity and quality of weather and climate related instruction.
These goals will be accomplished through a highly structured series of readings, web based activities using a range of on-line resources, development and maintenance of a local weather journal, and the development and peer review of weather and climate class room activities. This course is specially designed for practicing science teachers at the middle to high school level.

This course is a prerequisite for our new course, Understanding Climate Change, which will be offered this fall. It is also part of the proposed Graduate Certificate in Science Teaching in Climate Change.



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ERTH 594: Geology Seminar: Geology of Mars

Credits: 1

This course will focus on the planetary evolution and geology of the Red Planet, Mars. Mars has intrigued astronomers and geologists since long before the invention of the telescope, when its distinctive red color inspired ancient Greeks and Romans to name it the God of War (Greek – Ares). The surface of Mars is geologically variable and includes one of the largest volcanoes in the solar system (Olympus Mons), an incredibly deep and long canyon system that dwarfs the Grand Canyon (Valles Marineris), polar ice caps, a low basin in the northern hemisphere that may have been the floor of an ancient ocean (Borealis Basin), dune fields, and dendritic stream channel systems, to name a few. Mars has been the subject of intensive planetary exploration, with both orbiting spacecraft and surface rovers, often with the objective of determining if microbial life did (or does) exist on the planet’s surface. Therefore, we will also explore scientific theories for planetary habitability and the origin of life on Earth and other planets and moons, within and outside of our solar system. New data and images from NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity Rover) will be incorporated into this one-day course.

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BIOE 513: Terrestrial Ecology of Plains and Prairies

Credits: 1

Grassy areas – plains, prairies and meadows – rarely get the attention that lakes do, for example, or forests. But are grassy areas really that boring? What is the difference between the grass in your lawn and the bunchgrass in the field? Why are grasslands of any size important? How does land use change community composition?

In this course, we will take a closer look at one or two grass communities near your home or school and address these questions and others. You will complete six activities in this course:
  • Examine grass plants and learn some of their biology.
  • Locate and describe an important grassland in your area, a park, for example, explaining why it is special.
  • Locate and describe one or two study areas for your class project that ideally could be used for your own classroom activities.
  • Identify 8-10 major plants in your study areas and construct a dichotomous key to the plants that could be used by your students.
  • Quantitatively compare two features between or within your study areas, collecting data and analyzing them statistically (a sample statistics problem will be provided).
  • Write a short paper on your project, following scientific paper format. A “Question of the Week” will spark discussion among class members.
This course will get you outside, investigating areas that you find interesting and relevant to you and your students. It may be combined with BIOL 519: Biology of Riparian Zones and Wetlands, for observing similarities and differences between drier and wetter communities.

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BIOE 519: Biology of Riparian Zones and Wetlands

Credits: 2

Building a home along the bank of a river (riparian zone) or draining a wet area (wetland) for “useful” purposes are commonplace activities throughout the country. But how do these activities change the functions of naturally occurring riparian zones and wetlands?

In this course, we will explore the structure and functions of these areas transitional between dry and aquatic communities, and their importance in the natural world. You will complete six activities in this course:
  • Read some on-line material about riparian zones and wetlands, and discuss the material.
  • Locate and describe an important riparian zone or wetland, a park for instance, in your area, explaining why it is special.
  • Locate and describe one or two study areas for your class project that ideally could be used for your own classroom activities.
  • Identify 8-10 major plants in your study areas and construct a dichotomous key to the plants that could be used by your students (or friends).
  • Quantitatively compare three features between or within your study areas, collecting data and analyzing them statistically (a sample statistics problem will be provided).
  • Write a short paper on your project, following scientific paper format. We will have a “Question of the Week” for sparking discussion among class members.
Science standards, federal and state, usually require field activities and ecological understanding. This course will get you outside, investigating areas that you find interesting and relevant to you and your students. This course can be combined with BIOL 513: Terrestrial Ecology of Plains and Prairies, for heightening awareness of the similarities and differences between grasslands and wetter areas.

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BIOE 520: Understanding and Managing Animal Biodiversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Credits: 2

The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is a dramatic setting composed of lands that vary widely in terms of their elevation, soils, habitat features, & animal diversity, as well as in terms of land ownership, land use, and wildlife management. This course is designed to explore how animal diversity is distributed across the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE), why such a distribution exists, & the consequences of those distributions to animal conservation. To gain a better understanding of the causes & consequences of spatial patterns of biodiversity, we will explore a variety of locations in Yellowstone National Park and its surrounding National Forests, Wildlife Refuges, and private lands.

This course will have the following components for studying animal conservation in the GYE in today’s changing world:
  • Who are the animals of the GYE? Field identification, species ecology and life histories, and species-specific habitat needs.
  • How are species distributed across the GYE? Where is diversity high versus low? Why might such patterns exist?
  • How well do the distributions of species overlap with (a) existing National Park lands, (b) other wildlife reserve lands, and (c) private lands?
  • How can we use knowledge of such patterns to conserve diverse species of wildlife in the GYE?
The course builds foundations in morning lectures, discussion, quizzes and lab exercises. Field trips include visits to diverse habitats in Yellowstone National Park and surrounding lands, techniques of animal identification, and in-depth discussion of key topics in the course. Field trips seek to build an understanding of the unique challenges of and innovative strategies for managing diverse species in a complex and changing world.

Physical Fitness Requirement:
Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes on established trails.

Time Commitment: 7-10 hrs/day

Please Note:
Drs. Rotella, Maxwell, and Johnson have coordinated their curricula for the three (3) mini-session classes listed below so that the 3 courses each stand alone; but also, if taken together, form a coherent package. If possible, you are encouraged to register for the courses together as a "package" in one summer or over a couple of summers to maximize the content benefit gained for each class. Although you are certainly welcome to take any combination of the courses in any order that suits you, we urge you to consider taking the entire 3-week package:
  • June 16-20, 2014
    BIOE 520 Understanding and Managing Animal Biodiversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jay Rotella)
  • June 30-July 3, 2014
    BIOE 591 Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jerry Johnson)
  • July 7-11, 2014
    LRES 569 Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Bruce Maxwell)


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BIOE 522: Birds of Prey of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Credits: 2

This course is designed to explore the ecology and habitats of raptor species that live in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE). Birds of prey include all species of raptors. Raptors are birds with unique specializations for killing prey, e.g., raptorial claw-like feet and massive bills designed to rip, tear, and crush their prey. The course will explore strategies raptors use to find things to eat and safe places to nest. We will pay special attention to the influence of human activities on raptors and their habitats.

This course will have the following components for studying birds of prey in the GYE:
  • Who are the Birds of Prey in the GYE? Field identification of raptors, species ecology and life histories, and species-specific habitat needs.
  • Examination of key principles of raptor population ecology (studying survival and reproduction).
  • Reinforce methods of discovery: raptor responses to human encroachment into wilderness.
  • Review inquiry-based learning: the scientific method and things raptors eat (the concept of “resource availability”).
The course builds foundations in morning lectures, discussion, quizzes and lab exercises. Afternoon field trips include techniques of raptor identification and studying raptor ecology. Field trips will integrate methods to study trends in raptor population status and habitat quality.

Physical fitness requirement: Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes on established trails and an overnight stay in Jack Creek.



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BIOE 523: Wildlife Ecology of Northern Rocky Mountains

Credits: 2

The course is designed as an introduction to the Ecology of the Rocky Mountains as showcased within Yellowstone National Park. The Park may well be one of the few intact wild ecosystems in the lower 48 states. The course content will include principles and techniques for studying wildlife populations in the field. This course will also focus on large mammalian and avian wildlife populations that occupy terrestrial ecosystems within the Northern Rocky Mountains. The course will have the following components:
  • Examine key principles of ecology, particularly population ecology, and review fundamental connections among species, populations, communities, and ecosystems.
  • Use the platform of ecology to discern methods to study wildlife responses to human disturbances (e.g., habitat loss, increased urban development and encroachment in wilderness, and global warming).
  • Explore contemporary issues of wildlife management within the Northern Rockies (e.g., wolf reintroductions in Yellowstone National Park).
This course will be based in the wildlife lab on MSU's campus on Monday. During Tuesday through Friday morning, the course will be field-based. We will leave Bozeman on Tuesday and return to Bozeman on Friday mid-day. We will camp for three nights during the week and cook our meals at campsites. Transportation will be provided by the MSU motor pool (vans) - no personal vehicles permitted (no exceptions).A maximum of 10 students are allowed to take this course. To enroll in this campus summer field course, email the MSSE Office (dianap@montana.edu) and ask to be added to the waiting list.

Students are expected to provide the following minimum equipment for their camping needs:
  • One- or two-person, light-weight, non-bulky tent (no big, heavy “family” tents – we won’t have room for these); team up with another student to share a two-person tent if possible.
  • Sleeping bag and pad (no bulky air mattresses).
  • Basic cooking equipment + utensils (team-up with another student) – no big Coleman stoves or lanterns (bring small, lightweight, back-packing equipment.
  • Minimal clothing for one week (layers for hot and cold weather).
  • Largest can available of bear “pepper-spray” (active ingredient = capsaicin).
  • Personal toiletries, sunglasses, hat, daypack, water bottle, sunscreen, camera, field notebook and pen, etc.
  • Food for 1 day (we will restock food supplies on a daily basis, or as needed).
  • Large coolers will be provided for perishable food.
Physical Fitness requirements. The course requires moderate outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to walk several miles, often in relatively steep terrain without established hiking trails. Please contact the instructor before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet these requirements.

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BIOE 591: Ecology & Conservation of the World's Marine Ecosystems - An Online Course for Teachers

Credits: 3

The course is designed for students to gain a broad understanding of structure and function of the world's marine ecosystems and a broader knowledge of the major conservation issues in the oceans including climate change, overfishing, coral reef loss, and ocean acidification. The course will integrate in-depth studies of each of the major marine ecosystems with reading and discussion of major conservation issues. The textbook will be used to lay the foundation of understanding of the major ecosystems and conservation issues but students will also be required to utilize other materials from various resources, including scientific articles, "popular" books, and online videos. Students will develop and share lesson plans using case studies for implementation of course concepts into middle school or high school science classes.

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BIOE 591: Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Credits: 2

This course will lay the groundwork for an understanding of the legal and political basis for scientific management of natural resources on public and private lands in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Readings, field visits and skill-building exercises will equip science educators with the social context of complex ecological issues.

Issues facing policy makers in complex administrative jurisdictions like the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem require a consideration of the social, legal and economic environment as well as understanding the scientific questions. Both are necessary if society is to successfully address issues like recovery of endangered species, rural sprawl, or wildfire. The laws that govern the development of the vast storehouse of natural resources in the West are based in a time some call the era of the "Lords of Yesterday". They are the product of a more freewheeling period of our economic and political history. They include water law, hardrock mining law, timber and grazing, and the designation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872. These laws play a direct role in how and why the resource agencies manage public lands in the West.

Today, economic, social, and political changes are sweeping the West. The emergent New West is often in conflict with the Old as extractive industry gives way to tourism, retirees, and a service-based economy. While the impacts of our extractive history are well understood, those resulting from rapid land use and social change are less so; from employment patterns to politics, the new west is different from the old.

Please Note:
Drs. Rotella, Maxwell, and Johnson have coordinated their curricula for the three (3) mini-session classes listed below so that the 3 courses each stand alone; but also, if taken together, form a coherent package. If possible, you are encouraged to register for the courses together as a "package" in one summer or over a couple of summers to maximize the content benefit gained for each class. Although you are certainly welcome to take any combination of the courses in any order that suits you, we urge you to consider taking the entire 3-week package:
  • June 22-26, 2015
    BIOE 520 Understanding and Managing Animal Biodiversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jay Rotella)
  • July 6-10, 2015
    LRES 569 Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Bruce Maxwell)
  • July 6-10, 2015
    BIOE 591 Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jerry Johnson)


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BIOE 591: Alpine Ecology

Credits: 2

Our primary goals in this course will be to understand how altitude affects the structure, function and evolution of plants, animals and the communities to which they belong, and to create ways to bring this understanding into the grade 6-12 classroom. Through a mix of online, class and field work, students will move rapidly from basic concepts, to hands-on field work and data collection, to the synthesis and presentation of those data. During class time, students will work on ways to integrate the material we gather in the field into multimedia presentations that can be used in teaching modules. In the field, students will collect data that can in turn be analyzed and interpreted later by their own students. Students will present and share data and teaching module components with each other on the last day of class, Friday.

For us to progress smoothly during the class week based out of MSU, 2 to 3 weeks of background reading and study are necessary. Pre-class week materials, including homework assignments, will be posted on the course’s Desire to Learn (D2L) website beginning June 15th.

Field class will be based out of the Jack Creek Preserve. During the day, students will work cooperatively to gather data, photos and (optional) video clips in the field, then in the evenings will work together to link visual materials back to the data. The goal here is to create a virtual field trip for primary and secondary level students, illustrating every aspect of a simple descriptive natural history study, from initial observations, to hypothesis generation, to data gathering, to data summary and finally to drawing overall conclusions. In addition, there will be nightly lectures on concepts and topics relevant to alpine ecology, including island biogeography theory and climate change.

Grading: Grades will be based on a combination of pre-class homework (1/3); mid-class progress and discussion (1/3); final wrap-up discussions and presentation of teaching module components (1/3).

Physical Fitness Requirements: Field days will be long (up to 10 hours) and sometimes strenuous. Students must be prepared to spend the better part of 5 days hiking and doing field work in rugged terrain at high elevations (7000 to 9000’+). Those coming from low elevation areas are encouraged to arrive 7 to 10 days early and spend that time at or above 5000’ to acclimatize before class begins. (Most of Yellowstone Park is above 6000’.)

Course Syllabus

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EDCI 504: 802: 803: 804: Assessment and Evaluation in Education

Credits: 3

Evaluation is an ongoing process in education. This course will engage students in discussions and practice regarding the construction, use and reporting of numerous assessment methods. The emphasis of the course is on classroom assessment with the intent of informing and improving classroom instruction through the use of assessment strategies.

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EDCI 509: 802: 803: 804: Implementing Action Research in Teaching and Learning

Credits: 3

This is a course in the implementation of classroom-based educational research for practicing teachers. Students will learn how to effectively conduct action research based on their individual teaching situation and its implications for their professional development.

MSSE is running multiple sections of this course. You will be assigned the same instructor you had when you took EDCI 505 when possible.

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EDCI 537: Contemporary Issues in Science Education

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide an overview of pertinent contemporary science education issues and how to incorporate these ideas into an instructional setting.

This course will help students learn the conceptual underpinnings of best practice approaches to science education and professional development as they relate specifically to teaching and learning science at multiple levels, including traditional classrooms and informal science education settings. Topics covered include science education reform efforts, technology in instruction, science education standards, assessment, teachers as leaders, controversial issues in the science classroom and more. Weekly assignments include online readings, discussion among colleagues and reflection on the content.

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EDCI 540: American Indian Studies for Educators

Credits: 3

To equip teachers with the skills, knowledge, and dispositions to meet Indian Education for All or state certification requirements. Instruction pertains to the history, traditions, values, beliefs, languages, educational policies, learning styles and contemporary affairs of American Indians, particularly tribal groups in the Northern Plains Region.

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EDCI 552: Human Development and the Psychology of Learning

Credits: 3

Human growth and development (physical, cognitive, emotional, moral). Early field experience: (neonatal care center; pre-school; elementary school; middle school; high school; university or adult education center; nursing home or elderly care center). The psychology of learning; theories of skill and knowledge acquisition. Motivation and Discipline; the school as social environment; Montessori's insights.

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EDCI 553: Diversity, Special Needs, and Classroom Discipline

Credits: 3

This course is designed to meet certification requirements in the areas of Special Needs, Diversity and Multicultural Education, and related topics in Classroom Management. It is designed to equip new teachers with the skills, knowledge, and dispositions to meet the teaching profession's expectation that public school classrooms operate to serve the needs of all learners. This course will provide the theoretical content that will then be mirrored in the second internship of this program sequence (EDCI 559).

Topics to be covered will include:

  • Theories of Democracy (meritiocracy vs social democracy)
  • Democracy as a sociocultural dynamic
  • The history of human empowerment and the role of education
  • Valuing Traditional Cultures
  • Understanding modern scientific-technological culture
  • Youth Culture
  • Deviance
  • The Civil Rights movement and its legacy
  • Special needs and the classroom
  • Management of the Social Environment
  • Classroom Discipline
  • The culturally and ethnically diverse classroom (case studies)
  • Are there different learning styles?
  • Are curriculum materials biased?


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EDCI 554: Curriculum Design, Pedagogy and Assessment (EARLY SUMMER 2015)

Credits: 3

This course is designed to meet licensure requirements in the areas of Curriculum Design, Pedagogy, and Assessment. It is designed to equip new teachers with the skills, knowledge, and dispositions to meet the teaching profession’s expectations in the area of planning and preparation of daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly curriculum. This course will provide the practical planning content that will then be mirrored in the first internship of the program sequence (EDCI 558).

Topics to be covered will include:
  • Historical and contemporary curriculum standards
  • National standards
  • State and district standards
  • Instructional objectives
  • Varieties of assessment
  • Writing effective and appropriate assessments
  • Aligning assessments to professional standards and instructional objectives
  • Theory and practice of instructional design
  • Content, pedagogical content knowledge, and pedagogy
  • Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design

NOTE: As there are multiple sections of this course open for registration, be sure you register for the dates you want.



NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by two different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 554: Curriculum Design, Pedagogy and Assessment (LATE SUMMER 2015)

Credits: 3

This course is designed to meet licensure requirements in the areas of Curriculum Design, Pedagogy, and Assessment. It is designed to equip new teachers with the skills, knowledge, and dispositions to meet the teaching profession’s expectations in the area of planning and preparation of daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly curriculum. This course will provide the practical planning content that will then be mirrored in the first internship of the program sequence (EDCI 558).

Topics to be covered will include:
  • Historical and contemporary curriculum standards
  • National standards
  • State and district standards
  • Instructional objectives
  • Varieties of assessment
  • Writing effective and appropriate assessments
  • Aligning assessments to professional standards and instructional objectives
  • Theory and practice of instructional design
  • Content, pedagogical content knowledge, and pedagogy
  • Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design

NOTE: As there are multiple sections of this course open for registration, be sure you register for the dates you want.



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EDCI 555: Technology, Instructional Design, and Learner Success

Credits: 3

Practicing teachers will build knowledge in instructional technology through research and practice to design, implement and evaluate student-focused technology integration projects that enhance student learning. Teachers will integrate concepts from learning theories, frameworks for “Teaching with Understanding” and project based learning. Online reflections, discussions, synchronous scheduled meetings, and journals of reflection and intent will be utilized to clearly identify models of best practice.

NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by three different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 556: 802: The Legal, Social and Practical Basis of Schooling

Credits: 3

Managing the Classroom Environment; Record-keeping; Legal Issues; Professionalism; Professional Dispositions; The School as a Political and Social Institution; State and Local Educational Authorities; How schools are governed; Teacher Organizations; Inside the Classroom (case studies); Managing multiple, competing influences; Working with Parents; Community Resources; Networking for Professional Development.

NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by two different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 557: 802: Brain Science, Educational Research, and Teaching

Credits: 3

Cultural systems, Academic Disciplines, and School Subjects; what is mathematics and how do we teach it? What is science, natural language, history, literature, art, social studies, health enhancement, technology and how do we teach these? This course will examine a variety of standard educational theory-and-practice paradigms, considering how each configures our understanding and approach to teaching. Questions of curriculum development, instructional practice, and assessment will be examined. The course will also consider how schools can integrate the curriculum for meaning and comprehension. What brain research says about the structure and processes of schooling will also be considered.

NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by two different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 558: 802: Internship I: Methods of Teaching

Credits: 3

This course is designed to meet certification requirements in the area of general teaching methods. It is designed to equip new teachers with the skills, knowledge, concepts and dispositions to meet the teaching profession’s expectation that public school classrooms provide meaningful learning for each student, based upon the student’s prior knowledge and specific learning style(s). The course builds upon information from EDCI 552, 553, and 554. Included in this course are instructional concepts related to assessment, planning, standards, teaching strategies, student motivation, classroom management and working with colleagues and families.

NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by two different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 559: 802: Internship II - Equity, Special Needs and Diversity

Credits: 3

In this course students will learn about how teachers can use reflective practice to learn from their experiences, understand the context of specific teaching practices, and direct theoretical understanding into practice. The commitment to equity and excellence is discussed in light of assessing student competencies while meeting national, state, and local standards. A major portion of the course deals with understanding students who are in special education, federal special education law, principles and benefits of the law to learners aged infant through 21. The alignment of general education law and special education law is taught along with other federal laws that benefit students with disabilities.

NPTT is running multiple sections of this course taught by two different instructors. If you want to request a specific instructor, you can do so in the "Comments" section at the end of the online registration form and we will do what we can to accommodate your request.

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EDCI 564: The Comprehensive Portfolio

Credits: 3

This course is designed to accommodate the end phase of the Northern Plains Transition to Teaching program and the Practitioner Strand of the regular Master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction. In both cases, the purpose of the course is to provide support to the process of assembling a capstone portfolio that becomes the basis of the Comprehensive Exam for the master’s degree. This course follows the general guidelines and practices of the educational profession in the use of portfolios, as evidenced in the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, the Interstate New Teacher Assistance and Support Consortium, and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

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EDCI 575: Professional Capstone Paper & Symposium in Science Education

Credits: 3

Each Master of Science in Science Education (MSSE) student, under the guidance of her or his graduate committee, identifies and completes a science education capstone project. Each project is designed to provide experience and information that aids our understanding of science teaching-learning or science curriculum. The capstone project topic is identified during the student's graduate program and relates to science education in the student's educational setting or provides the student with a science research experience that can be connected to the student’s educational setting. The capstone project links multiple courses in the student's program of study in both the core and science content areas. A student begins the capstone in the fall of the final year by submitting a brief proposal to his/her advisors.

The results of each student's capstone project are summarized in a written, professional paper completed by mid-term of the final summer session. In addition, during the final summer session of a student's graduate program each student presents their capstone project to their committee, their classmates, and other interested persons at the Symposium in Science Education.

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EDCI 577: OPI Internship-Teacher Certification

Credits: 1

This course is a classroom-based internship designed for experienced, licensed teachers who are completing added teaching endorsements.

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EDCI 588: Supervision of Student Teachers

Credits: 2

Please note that 588 courses are intended as professional development for practicing teachers and cannot be applied toward credit requirements for graduate degree programs.

This course is a comprehensive program for the supervision and mentoring of novice or beginning teachers. Topics include: observational skills, conference skills, developmental levels of new teachers, reflective practice, and analysis of teaching performance. The course is limited to experienced teachers who will be working with student teachers.

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EDCI 588: 2017 MBI Summer Institute: Achieving Student Success with the Montana Behavioral Initiative Model

Credits: 2


Please note that 588 courses are intended as professional development for practicing teachers and cannot be applied toward credit requirements for graduate degree programs.

The Summer Institute is intense training, which occurs in the summer to train teachers with the skills necessary to implement the MBI model in their school district. The Institute will focus on positive behavior support and intervention and positive school climate. The top behavior experts in the United States will be presenting the training. It is the overall goal of this Summer Institute to motivate and equip individuals, schools and communities to unite in nurturing competent, caring and responsible children, and adolescents with an emphasis on safe schools.

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EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Fall Ecological Field Studies

Credits: 3

Please register using CRN 25161
This course is designed for formal and informal educators who are interested in integrating inquiry oriented, experienced-based, environmental studies into their educational program. Participants will learn basic ecological field study techniques and conduct studies in their local environment. A wide variety of field studies will be presented and the participants will share their ecological data and field study results on-line. Basic ecological concepts will be presented in the context of the field studies. The course will address science and environmental education standards especially as they relate to inquiry oriented teaching and learning and local place-based studies. Educators will have many opportunities to share their views on a variety of topics related to the environment and education. The course will allow the participants to learn more about the ecology, teaching and learning.

This is a practical course in teaching about the environment and working with children. We are looking for educators with a variety of backgrounds and would like representation from as many regions of the U.S. and other countries as possible. This will help insure a wide variety of ecological results and good opportunities to compare ecosystems and bioregions of the world. Although it is not required, we suggest conducting as many of these field studies with family, friends, students and other interested people as possible. If you are not currently teaching children, conducting studies with family and/or friends is acceptable. We will encourage you to share how you will adapt or adopt these techniques to your own educational and ecological situation. Everyone's context is different and in this class we do learn much from each other's experiences.

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EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Summer Ecological Field Studies

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11140
This course is designed for educators of children in grades 6-12 to learn and practice basic ecological field techniques and integrate them into their instruction. This course focuses on summer field ecological studies including stream, forest, plant and bird studies. All studies will be completed outdoors in your local environment. A wide variety of field study techniques will be presented and the participants will share the results of the studies. Basic ecological concepts will be presented in the context of the field studies. Participants will have many opportunities to share their views on a variety of topics related to the environment and education. This course is a great opportunity to meet and interact with educators throughout the USA whose work focuses on ecology and young people.

Summer ecological field study activities will include:
  • Herbarium Compilation
  • Local Flora Description; Plants Species List
  • Vertical Structure of a Forest
  • Grass, Canopy and Flying Invertebrates Population
  • Birds Nesting Behavior
  • Complex Comparative Description of Small Rivers and Streams
  • Study of Aquatic Invertebrates and Assessment of Environmental Status
  • Plankton Investigation in the Near Shore Part of Lake or Pond
  • The Estimation of Ecological Situation of Grasslands and Meadows using Ecological Ordination Techniques
  • The Estimation of Ecological Health of the Forest Based on Leaf Symmetry Observations
This is a practical course in teaching about the environment and working with children. We are looking for a good distribution of 6-12 grade educators and would like representation from as many regions of the U.S. as possible. This will help insure a wide variety of results and good opportunities to compare ecosystems and regions of the country. We also want individuals who are planning to implement the field study techniques in their classroom or with groups of students in informal settings. We will encourage you to share how you will adapt or adopt these techniques to your own teaching and ecological situation. Everyone's situation is different and we can learn much from each other. It is not required that you actually teach these field studies to children as part of the course but we do encourage you to do the studies with other people who can share their impressions of the activity with you.

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EDCI 591: Project Archaeology - Investigating a Plains Tipi

Credits: 2

MT Join Project Archaeology at the Museum of the Rockies to learn how to bring archaeology and history into your classroom! You will receive the research-based curriculum guide, "Project Archaeology: Investigating Shelter" which addresses the goals of the Montana Common Core. This guide will help you take learning to a deeper level by incorporating English Language Arts, Social Studies and Science. The guide is inquiry-based, cross-curricular, includes performance-based assessments, incorporates the indigenous voice and promotes cultural understanding. Students learn to analyze artifacts, primary documents, and oral histories related to authentic archaeological sites using the basics of scientific inquiry (observation, inference, evidence and classification) providing students with college and career readiness skills. Hope you can join us as we travel back in time to learn about Montana's historic past!


On campus housing is available. Room rates start at $23 per person per night sharing a room, or $28 per night for single rooms. All rooms are subject to a 7% per night occupancy tax. Rooms include linens (two sheets, mattress pad, pillow case, and blanket), towels, and bath soap. Please contact Sara Jay in Conference Services to register for on campus accommodations. She can be reached at (406) 994-6583 or sara.jay@montana.edu

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EDCI 591: Comparative International Education

Credits: 3

This is a course in comparative and international education. Students explore differences in public and private high schools in different countries, with a particular emphasis on discovering why different systems of education produce different results on international standardized comparisons of student achievement.

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EDCI 591: Environmental Science Education: Winter Ecological Field Studies

Credits: 3

CRN 34201
This course is designed for educators to learn and practice basic ecological field study techniques and integrate them into their environmental, science or ecology instruction. From late January to April, this course focuses on winter field studies including aquatic, snow, forest, mammal and bird studies. A number of indoor lab-based studies are also included for those times when it is impossible to get outside. A wide variety of field study techniques will be presented and the participants will share the results of the environmental studies on-line. Basic ecological concepts will be presented in the context of the field studies. Educators will have opportunities to share their views on a variety of topics related to the environment and education. The course will allow the participants to learn more about various ecological regions and approaches to teaching in nature.

Although we would like to have participants teach these lessons to their students, it is not required that you be a practicing teacher. It is possible to do the field studies on your own or with cooperating family, friends and neighbors.

Winter ecological field study activities will include:
  • Campfire Preparation in Snow
  • Simple Mapping of Local Study Area
  • Growth Dynamics of Trees Based on Analysis of Annual Rings
  • Geobotanical Forest Mapping
  • Green Grass Ecology Beneath Snow Cover
  • Chickadee Flock Territorial Behavior
  • Mammals Winter Population Survey
  • Mammals Behavior Studies Based on Snow Tracks
  • Physics and Chemical Characteristics of Streams and Rivers
  • Snow Cover Strata on the River Valley Profile


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EDCI 591: History of Spaceflight and Space Technology

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 24088
The purpose of this course is to introduce space science concepts associated with exploration and technology to build core knowledge that can be incorporated into the classroom. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to do the following:
  • Timeline human and robotic space exploration from its inception through the end of the space shuttle era
  • Understand many of the technological and human challenges of spaceflight, as well as the political forces that have shaped the space program's history
  • Understand scientific breakthroughs accredited to the space program
  • Understand the historical significance of space flight and the impact it has had on national identity
  • Evaluate the potential for future exploration and utilization of solar system resources.


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EDCI 591: Symbiosis - Eat, Prey, and Love

Credits: 3

CRN 33820
This course is all about the relationships between organisms. These relationships are all around us from organisms such as lichens that are composed of two separate species that can’t live on their own to the complex relationships that exist between clownfish and anemones. The relationship can also be harmful such as with heartworms in dogs. The complexity of the relationships in the world around us gives numerous opportunities to connect with your school curriculum.

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EDCI 598: NPTT Internship: Student Teaching

Credits: 6

STUDENT TEACHING: An individualized assignment arranged with the Northern Plains Transition to Teaching program to provide guided experience in the field.

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EDCI 598: NPTT Internship: Paid Internship

Credits: 1

PAID INTERNSHIP: An individualized assignment arranged with the Northern Plains Transition to Teaching program to provide guided experience in the field.

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EDLD 507: Foundations of Educational Leadership

Credits: 3

This is the entry course for the K-12 Educational Leadership program. Topics included are leadership theory and practice; instructional leadership; basic organization theory; working with students, staff, parents, and community; creating a vision and a strategic plan for realizing the vision; and the identification and initial development of leadership skills, including a personal and professional code of ethics.

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EDLD 515: Planned Change

Credits: 3

A study of the change process as applied to schools. Includes the theory and process of change, research about change, roles and practice, change models and systems, and leadership in school improvement planning and implementation, and evaluation of changed systems.

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EDLD 526: Evaluation of School Programs

Credits: 3

This course will examine evaluation and reporting techniques for school programs. Students will be required to use data to evaluate and report on an existing school program.

This course is designed to develop skills, insights, and understanding of how educational leaders and other school personnel can use research to improve schools, with emphasis on the use of assessment and research data to identify school improvement needs and to design school improvement projects.

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EDLD 555: Montana School Finance

Credits: 3

This course prepares school leaders to identify and analyze sources of fiscal and non-fiscal revenue and resources for schools and school districts, to manage financial and material assets, to develop an efficient budget planning process, and to perform a variety of budget management functions. Course emphasis is on Montana school finance.

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EDLD 565: K-12 Instructional Leadership

Credits: 3

Students will examine issues, challenges, and processes of leading quality curriculum and instruction in K-12 schools. The course is designed to prepare school leaders, both teachers in leadership positions and principals, with an understanding of curriculum development and instructional design in K-12 schools that ensures the success of all students.

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EDLD 620: The School Superintendent

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the leadership skills necessary for the school district superintendent. There is emphasis on superintendent relations with the school board and the community, and working with stakeholders to identify priorities. The development of effective and appropriate communication strategies and interpersonal skills that promote public confidence is stressed.
Low cost dorm rooms are available. Please call Sara Jay at 994-6583 to make arrangements. You will have to tell her the course you are taking.

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EDLD 645: Personnel Management in Education

Credits: 3

This course is designed to prepare educational leaders to apply effective job analysis procedures, to understand performance appraisal for instructional and non-instructional staff, formulate professional growth plans, negotiate union agreements, and apply appropriate policies, criteria, processes for recruitment, selection, induction, and compensation of personnel with an emphasis on equity and diversity.
Low cost dorm rooms are available. Please call Sara Jay at 994-6583 to make arrangements. You will have to tell her the course you are taking.

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EDLD 650: Montana Finance and Facilities

Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate a more in depth understanding of the efficient and effective use of finances, facilities, and other tangible and intangible resources at the school district level. An emphasis will be placed on equitable distribution of resources and the alignment of resources to strategic plans and district vision.

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EDLD 655: Montana Legal and Policy Studies

Credits: 3

This course is designed to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of legal issues relative to education and their policy implications. Students will increase their understanding of how legal decisions impact their school. They will explore policy analysis and implementation, and develop an understanding of how laws, policies, and systemic organizational life are intertwined.

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EELE 591: Solar Cell Basics for Science Teachers

Credits: 2

Solar Cell Basics is a course for science educators, to train them to teach principles of solar cells. The course is designed to help science teachers, grades 6 to 12, understand the operating principles and the fabrication processes of modern solar cells that convert light energy to electrical energy. The course has a laboratory component in which solar cells will be fabricated in the Montana Microfabrication Facility (MMF). Each student will process 4 inch silicon wafers using the various steps necessary to make solar cells.

The course prerequisites are a minimum of 2 years successful science teaching experience, enrolled in MSSE degree, or by instructor approval. Participants must hold a bachelor’s degree in science, science education or a related area. Participants should have an understanding of basic chemistry and physics principles.

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ENTO 510: Insect Ecology

Credits: 3

Please register using CRN 34542
The course covers the physiological, population, and community ecology of insects and related invertebrates. Specific topics include insect size, scaling, and ecological consequences, the Influence of biotic and abiotic factors on insect population and community dynamics, seasonal adaptations, dispersion, life table analysis, r- and k-selection, ecological methods, and insect-plant interactions. Case studies include examples based on the professional and research interests of students. Course activities include discussions, textbook and literature readings, written assignments, and exams.

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GEO 521: Dinosaur Paleontology I

Credits: 2

This course is designed as an introduction to the geology and dinosaur paleontology of the Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana. The Hell Creek Formation has long been known for its diverse dinosaur taxa, including Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, as well as exposures of the iridium layer associated with dinosaur extinction 65 million years ago. The combination of slide presentations, labs, and daily hiking in Makoshika State Park will provide both background information and “hands-on” learning experience. Techniques covered during the class include interpretation of sedimentary environments, taphonomy, and fossil collection and preparation. This course will integrate many aspects of biology, physical geology, paleogeography, and tectonics.

Two transportation options are available:
  1. Vans will leave from the Strand Union Building (south entrance) on the MSU campus at 8 a.m. Monday morning and drive to Makoshika State Park near Glendive, MT. Approximately driving time is seven hours.
  2. Participants may drive their own vehicles and meet Monday, June 22nd 4pm at the Lion’s Club facility, Sleepy Hollow Lodge within Makoshika State Park.
Lunch will be provided on travel days.

The facilities include individual cabins that are rustic but completely furnished and accommodate 4 to 6 students, a lodge where meals will be provided, and a separate shower house with toilet facilities. Students should furnish their own bedding and personal items such as towels, shower shoes, etc. Special dietary requirements should be noted on the registration form. Students should have appropriate hiking boots and be prepared for rain and cool weather. Additional required items include backpack, field notebook and pencils, and water containers (3-4 liters total capacity).

Physical fitness requirements:
The course requires moderate to strenuous outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to walk several miles, often in relatively steep terrain without established hiking trails. Temperatures are often in the 90°F range. Please contact the instructor before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet these requirements.

Time Commitment: 10-12 hrs/day

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GEO 522: Dinosaur Paleontology II

Credits: 2

The goal and purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth course for grade 7-12 teachers in geology and paleontology that builds on previous experience and field techniques acquired from GEOL 521 Dinosaur Paleontology of the Hell Creek Formation. In addition to providing basic information on geology and paleontology, this field course includes information on how paleontologists use rocks, fossils and extant animals and modern environments to formulate interpretations about the past. By the end of this course, students will be able to identify sedimentary rocks in which fossils are found, use sedimentary structures for interpretation of depositional environments, and have a better understanding of Montana's geologic past.

Two transportation options are available:
  1. Vans will leave from the south entrance of the Strand Union Building on the MSU campus at 8:00 am Monday morning and drive to Museum of the Rockies field station, west of Choteau, MT. Approximate driving time is three hours.
  2. Participants may drive their own vehicles and meet Monday at noon at the field station.
Lunch will be provided in camp.

Facilities: Students will be camping with the regular paleontology field crew under rustic conditions. Please provide your own tent, sleeping bag, thermorest, or these may be rented through MSU Outdoor Recreation Center. Cooking equipment and dishes are provided, and a travel trailer is used for meal preparation. Special dietary requirements should be noted on the registration form. Students should have appropriate hiking boots and be prepared for rain and cool weather. Additional required items include backpack, field notebook, pencils, and water containers (3-4 liters total capacity).

Physical fitness requirements: The course requires moderate outdoor physical activity. Students are expected to walk a couple of miles at a reasonable pace in order to keep with the group, often in relatively steep terrain without established hiking trails. Temperatures are typically in the 90 degree range. Please contact the instructor before signing up for this class if you have concerns about the required physical fitness level and your ability to meet these requirements.

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LRES 557: Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park

Credits: 2

Co-listed as MB 547, so teachers can choose from which department they want the credit awarded. Indicate your preference on the registration form.

This course will provide a survey of the ecology of important organisms common in thermal habitats of Yellowstone National Park, including a review of different life forms and the physical and chemical habitats that define their environment. The course is structured to provide (1) a basic understanding of the ecology of a variety of life forms in thermal habitats, (2) a survey of observational techniques and hands-on activities appropriate for science educators, and (3) a field trip to visit and characterize several geothermal habitats environments. Fundamental principles of thermal biology will be emphasized during lectures and methods of chemical, physical and biological analyses will be emphasized during the laboratory component while on the MSU campus. A two day field trip to Yellowstone National Park (that includes camping in the park) will include discussion, sampling and characterizing diverse geothermal habitats.

Course Outline:
1) Introduction: Ecology of Thermal Environments
2) Chemical and Physical Properties Important in Geothermal Systems
3) Microbial and Viral Diversity in Thermal Habitats
4) Fungi, Algae, and Plants; Eukaryotes in Thermal Environments
5) Field Experience: Observe, describe and characterize diverse geothermal environments.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips will require walking distances of up to 5 miles with moderate slopes and will involve being in the field for the majority of the day. Weather may vary!

Transportation will be provided by MSU (vans) - no personal vehicles permitted (no exceptions).

Students are expected to provide the following minimum equipment for their camping needs:

  • Sleeping bag and pad (no bulky air mattresses), (We can provide these if needed).
  • Personal toiletries, sunglasses, hat, daypack, water bottle, sunscreen, camera, field notebook and pen, etc.
  • Clothing for hot and cold weather (warm hat and coat, shorts and sun hat).
  • Good hiking shoes (no open toed shoes).
  • Food for lunches (we will restock food supply while in Yellowstone).
  • Large coolers will be provided for perishable food.

Tents and sleeping pads will be provided. Students will need to bring a sleeping bag. Sleeping bags are available for rent at the ASMSU Outdoor Recreation department by visiting http://www.montana.edu/outdoorrecreation or by phone at (406) 994-3621.

Time Commitment: 10-12 hrs/day

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LRES 569: Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Credits: 2

This five day course includes 3 days in the field making measurements on exotic invasive plants at a range of sites from the Gallatin Valley to the Gallatin National Forest and 2 days analyzing the data and using simulation models to explore plant invasiveness. The focus of this course is to directly involve students with testing methodology for monitoring the invasive potential of several exotic species in otherwise pristine mountain environments.

The questions that we will examine are:
  • Can we detect change in non-indigenous plant populations that will allow us to judge them as invasive?
  • What should be the criteria for determining if a non-indigenous plant species can have a significant impact on the ecosystem?
  • What should be the criteria for determining if a non-indigenous plant species can have a significant impact on the ecosystem?
Students will read the most current theories on what makes species invasive and what conditions invite or detour non-indigenous plant species. At least 1/3 of the field time will be used to discuss how these theories apply to our system.

Data analysis will place each student with a computer and include the use of Excel software. Small groups will be created and each group will analyze a different portion of the field data. Integration of field ecology into K-12 classes will be discussed throughout the course.

Physical Fitness Requirement:
Field trips can require walking up to 2 miles on moderate to steep slopes off established trails.

Required Equipment:
Hands lens; compass with mirror for shooting an azimuth; clipboard; good pair of hiking shoes; and a small backpack to carry rain gear, lunch, and water.

Time Commitment: 10-12 hrs/day

Please Note:
Drs. Rotella, Maxwell, and Johnson have coordinated their curricula for the three (3) mini-session classes listed below so that the 3 courses each stand alone; but also, if taken together, form a coherent package. If possible, you are encouraged to register for the courses together as a "package" in one summer or over a couple of summers to maximize the content benefit gained for each class. Although you are certainly welcome to take any combination of the courses in any order that suits you, we urge you to consider taking the entire 3-week package:
  • June 22-26, 2015
    BIOE 520 Understanding and Managing Animal Biodiversity in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jay Rotella)
  • July 6-10, 2015
    LRES 569 Ecology of Invasive Plants in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Bruce Maxwell)
  • July 6-10, 2015
    BIOL 591 Land Use Issues in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Dr. Jerry Johnson)


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LRES 582: Streamside Science: Hands-On Approaches to Water Quality Education

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11647
The primary goal of this course is to increase the water resource knowledge of students through hands-on, field-based curriculum. To accomplish this, students will be asked to adopt a local stream and perform lab assignments "in the field" to better understand hands-on water quality monitoring techniques. The course will improve the teaching skills of secondary science teachers utilizing distant delivery technologies. By completing this course, secondary science teachers will have a better understanding and hands-on working knowledge of the characterization and quantification of water quality as it relates to secondary school science curriculum and environmental issues on a global scale. Curriculum standards will be linked to each lesson plan so that teachers can easily incorporate the content into their core curriculum.

Please read these documents for course expectations and details:

Course Overview (PDF)

Syllabus (PDF)



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LRES 583: The Dirt on Soil Science for Elementary Teachers

Credits: 1

CRN 35278

Kids love dirt and you can learn all about basic soil physical properties and processes in this exciting, interactive 6-week online course. Directed toward K-6 elementary school teachers who want to understand the science of "dirt," this course includes active discussion between your instructor and classmates in weekly online forums and creative lab activities easily adapted to your teaching situation.

The specific goals of this course are:

  • Expand your understanding of the concepts of soil science and use soil as a platform to teach other science disciplines such as biology, art, history and others.
  • Gain understanding of how soil is formed and getting dirty while discovering different soil textures.
  • Begin to understand your local soil/ landscape interactions.
  • Gain understanding of soil and water relationships.
  • Study how children's concepts of soil and land resources are developed in the classroom setting.
  • Strengthen skills in teaching basic soil science concepts, engaging students, and responding to student needs in the classroom.
  • Develop our own professional community of course participants, sharing teaching ideas, expertise and experience.


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LRES 584: The Twelve Principles of Soil Science

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 22824
Playing with DIRT! At your age? Believe it or not, soil (to some known as "dirt") is part of all of our lives on a daily basis. And, as environmental issues such as water quality, waste management, ecological biodiversity, land resource carrying capacity, and alternative land uses continue to gain more attention from the public, increasing demands will be placed on earth science, physical science, geology, geography, and general science teachers for curriculum to support our understanding of these issues. Soil science is not a new science, but one that has gained much attention and interest in the past decade. And, the study of soil science has taken on new, "real-life" meaning and significance in the last decade. Today scientists spend a great deal of time studying the soil-like materials of distant planets, the remote reaches of the earth, and even under the ocean floors.

The goal of this course is to introduce teachers to the basic principles of soil science as an integral part of the curriculum for environmental sciences, ecology, earth science, geology, water quality, and geography. The course is structured around twelve basic soil concepts, beginning with the significance of soil in our everyday lives and progressing through soil formation, the physical and chemical properties of soils, and the role soil and the earth play in environmental management today and in the future. This course is filled with "how to" classroom teaching opportunities and resources. A good share of the course addresses contemporary issues and readings. We'll integrate teaching DIRT with math, language arts, geography, social studies, artistic expression, chemistry, physics, and biology.

You'll learn about the soil in your own school yard or back yard, who to contact to get local "experts" and how to get your students more interested in environmental studies. This course is "hands on", participation oriented.

What goes on in the DIRTY DOZEN?

  • Study the significance of soil and the processes involved in soil formation and differentiation (did you know that all soils have names and identities and more than 14,000 different "soils" are recognized in the United States alone?).
  • Learn how to use such readily available resources as National Geographic, Science, and other popular magazines to introduce students to soil science and develop lessons that are fun in the classroom.
  • Develop better understanding of the relationship between soil and water quality, crop and vegetation management, and environmental science.


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LRES 585: Water Quality in the Classroom for Teachers

Credits: 3

CRN 35277
Would you love to incorporate more environmental science into your classroom without sacrificing time needed to address your required curriculum? Do you love hands on labs, but are limited by time and the cost of supplies? Teaching today's science curriculum requires both creativity and an integrated approach in the classroom. Water Quality in the Classroom is a 'must' course for teachers who want to expand their teaching portfolio to include a broader depth of STEAM sciences. Water quality can be called an "integrating" science, serving as a platform for expanded applications of chemistry, physics, biology, mathematics, geology, earth science, political and social sciences, and creative arts.

The Water Quality in the Classroom course has four central foci:
  • To increase teacher knowledge and assessment skills about the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of water quality investigations,
  • To help teachers develop and implement new and creative pedagogies for teaching water quality concepts in the secondary school science classroom,
  • Increase teacher awareness and understanding of some of the more significant global water quality issues that will face science teachers and their students in the 21st century, and
  • Develop professional relationships and information sharing through active course discussions and sharing.
This 13-week course teaches water quality concepts and how to demonstrate, explain, and teach them in the science classroom and beyond. The course format includes weekly "kitchen counter" experimentation, library and independent research, written homework, and course discussion.

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LRES 591: Lake Ecology

Credits: 2

  1. Learn about the biotic and abiotic factors that influence lake dynamics; we will specifically address lakes within Yellowstone National Park.
  2. Understand and perform field sampling and taxonomic and genetic identification techniques in the laboratory.
  3. Apply learned skills and knowledge in the classroom grades 5-12.
Students will be responsible for reading materials contained in a course packet and additional materials handed out throughout the course. Students should be prepared for any type of weather in the field.
    Grading is as follows:
  • 50% Participation. Students are expected to be present at all times and effectively participate in activities and discussion. Participation will be assessed on a daily basis.
  • 20% Group Presentation/Discussion. Student groups will led class discussion of assigned scientific journal articles.
  • 20% Lesson Plan. Each student will draft a 2-3 page lesson plan that incorporates aspects of this class. Lesson plans must be submitted to me no later than August 4th.
  • 10% GenBank Assignment. You will complete an assignment using a current scientific tool, GenBank. Lesson plans must be submitted to me no later than August 4th.

MSU educators, National Park Service resource managers, and other agency professionals will be joining the class to provide a multi-disciplinary perspective. The course will take place in Yellowstone National Park and on the MSU campus. Participants will camp in Yellowstone National Park July 21 and 22. Camping equipment can be rented inexpensively thorough REI in Bozeman. Participants should expect 1 or 2 short treks (4 miles or less) and be prepared to be outdoors in any type of weather. Breakfast and lunch will be provided; dinner in Yellowstone is the responsibility of each participant.

A class schedule and an equipment list will be posted. A course packet will be available prior to the course.

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MSSE 501: Inquiry through Science & Engineering Practices

Credits: 2

This course takes a practitioner's look at the art of inquiry instruction appropriate to all learning settings, including, but not limited to classrooms, museums, planetariums, etc. Using many of the current pedagogical approaches of instruction including constructivism, misconceptions, the 5 E learning model, reflective practice, conceptual change theory and others, students in this course will critically examine their current instructional practice and together craft new approaches to teaching inquiry in the science classroom through the lens of the Science & Engineering Practices as outlined in A Framework for K-12 Science Education. Course assignments include readings, reflections on Science & Engineering Practices, discussions and the completion of an individualized inquiry project. Students in the course can expect a highly active, fully engaging, professionally stimulating class session each week.

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MSSE 591: Web Tools for Teaching Science

Credits: 3

In this course, teachers of science will explore ways to use technology to enhance student learning. The purpose of the course is twofold. First, the course will assist educators in effectively using the web to enhance their professional learning. Second, the course will assist educators in using web tools, many of which students are already comfortable with using in social settings, to enhance student learning and ownership. The specific goals of this course include the following:
  • Articulate a rationale for using Internet-based technology during instruction.
  • Explore pedagogical innovations including flipped classroom approaches, gamification and other ways to use technology to create a student-centered environment.
  • Develop an initial personal learning network.
  • Explore a variety of web-based technology tools and example projects, including blogs, wikis, Google Docs, Google Earth, podcasting, screen capture, and photo sharing services, for professional growth and enhancing instruction.
  • Create a plan for implementing technology into the classroom.


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MSSE 591: Capstone Data Analysis

Credits: 2

This course is designed to provide graduate students in science education with a background in basic descriptive and inferential statistics. By the end of the course, students will be able to choose the most appropriate method to both describe their data and display that data in a clear and concise manner. Students will be able to perform hypothesis tests using a variety of parametric and non-parametric methods with an understanding of the assumptions and limitations of each method as applied to the analysis of capstone data. Students will be able to perform one-way analysis of variance tests in addition to chi-square tests for categorical data. Through the examination of the appropriate use of each of these statistical tools, students will be able to better design their capstone projects so as to maximize the likelihood of addressing their research topics.

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MSSE 591: Framework for Science Education

Credits: 2

The Framework for Science Education course provides teachers with an overview of A Framework for K-12 Science Education. The course will familiarize teachers with the eight science and engineering practices and seven Crosscutting Concepts from the Framework. The course utilizes activities that engage teachers in the Practices and Crosscutting Concepts with the goal of developing understanding of each Practice.  The outcome of the course will be deeper conceptual understanding of how to implement the Framework in the context of science and engineering instruction K-12.

John has over 35 years of experience with middle school and university instruction. He has a passion for helping teachers remain current with best practices in science education, including the Framework and NGSS.

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M 517: Modeling in a STEM World

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11571.

This course provides teachers with a sound understanding of modeling as a mathematical practice, as a context for teaching and reinforcing mathematics concepts, and as a means to integrate mathematics with other STEM disciplines.

Course goals include:
  • Examine the nature of mathematical modeling and how it compares to other types of problems and tasks. Discover how mathematical modeling is approached at different grade levels (e.g., elementary) and in different contexts (e.g., STEM disciplines).
  • Compare and contrast desirable habits of mind in mathematics, science, and engineering with a focus on modeling across STEM disciplines. Explore pedagogical practices that foster modeling in the context of effective STEM instruction.
  • Recognize the role of mathematics and modeling in a person’s ability to make the well-founded judgments needed by engaged and reflective citizens.
  • Solve a variety of modeling problems in mathematics and related STEM disciplines. Evaluate and critique lessons and tasks against mathematical modeling criteria.
  • Design activities and lessons that incorporate authentic (mathematical) modeling.


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M 518: Statistics for Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 10334
Stochastic concepts including probabilistic underpinnings of statistics, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation, distributions, sampling, and simulation. Exploratory data analysis including experiments, surveys, measures of association and inferential statistics. Discussion of methods for teaching statistics in secondary mathematics and science.

This course is designed to engage students using a modeling and simulation approach to inference. This course uses pedagogical principles that are founded in research, such as weekly small group discussion activities, in addition to the collection of weekly homework assignments. In this course, students will be exposed to numerous examples of real-world applications of statistics that are designed to help them think like statisticians and develop a conceptual understanding of statistics. Upon completion of this course, students should have an understanding of the foundational concepts of data, variation and inference, as well as an appreciation for the fundamental role that statistics plays in a host of disciplines, such as business, economics, law, and medicine.

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MB 536: Exploring Microbiology

Credits: 3

CRN 33806
The goal of this course is to provide science educators and others with the fundamentals of microbiology. This information will allow participants to expand their knowledge base and gain an appreciation of microbiology through readings, web searches, active participation in discussions, and a research project on microorganisms. They will also learn that microbiology can be applied in daily life, in biotechnology, and in studying complex issues such as our dependence on microbes. The course will also provide a foundation in microbiology for those who intend to take future courses such as microbial ecology, environmental microbiology, infectious diseases, immunology, and microbial genetics.

The following topics will be covered: evolution of microorganisms, cell structure and function, viruses and other acellular agents, microbial growth, antimicrobial compounds, and fungi.

Each participant will set up an experiment that will run for the entire semester, by designing a medium to study the growth of microbes from a source of their choosing. This activity will involve research on this subject, an experiment proposal, weekly observations summarized through updates, and a final report. The final assignment will be a PowerPoint presentation on the experiment.

This course requires consistent participation in weekly discussions, online quizzes, written assignments, and culminates in a final presentation. Participants will have proxy online access to the Montana State University library.

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MB 539: Infection and Immunity

Credits: 3

The fields of infectious disease and immunology have developed side-by-side, are closely intertwined, and are very active fields of research and practical medical application. Remarkable achievements in these fields have changed our lives. Some examples are the eradication of naturally acquired smallpox, the discovery and development of antimicrobial agents, and the development of vaccines that dramatically decrease the incidence of specific infectious diseases. But new challenges appear each year. We again worry about smallpox - now about the intentional release of this and other potential agents of bioterrorism. The emergence of drug-resistant microbes is an increasing problem. Previously undiscovered infectious agents are being described and associated with disease. The population of immune deficient humans is getting larger and the associated opportunistic infections are an increasingly important and difficult problem.

In this course, we will first address some basic aspects of microbiology as they relate to infectious disease. How are microbes different from each other and from humans, and why do these differences matter? How do antimicrobial agents kill or inhibit microbes without seriously harming humans? How do microbes aquire resistance to antimicrobial agents? Attention will then turn to the immune system, with emphasis on the roles of the immune system in infectious disease. Finally, and for about two-thirds of the course, we will examine important infectious diseases of humans: their causes, pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. In addition to assigned textbook and syllabus readings and online discussion, participants in the course will analyze scientific journal articles and solve case histories involving infectious disease and immunology.

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MB 540: Environmental Microbiology

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11142
Appreciating the complexity of the biosphere involves consideration of its microbial constituents. Environmental impacts and global climate change often show early evidence in its smallest inhabitants.

This course is designed for science educators, but will provide all interested participants with the fundamentals of environmental and applied microbiology. Information presented will enable individuals to expand their knowledge in these topics and challenge them to utilize microbes as indicators of environmental change.

This experience will be provided through:
  • discussions;
  • readings;
  • web resources;
  • quizzes;
  • assignments;
  • and in designing and implementing an ongoing hands-on research experiment.
Participants will gain an appreciation of how microorganisms are involved in supporting the biosphere. They will also learn how knowledge of environmental microbiology can be applied in biotechnology and complex issues, such as microbial diversity in natural environments, pathogenesis, bioremediation, biological control, water purification and wastewater treatment. This course complements others such as general microbiology, infectious diseases, microbial genetics, and studies on biofilms.

Participants will have proxy access to the Montana State University library online. A time commitment of 10-14 hours per week is typical, but those who are less familiar with the course material or online course delivery may need to put in extra time, especially early in the semester.

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MB 541: Microbial Genetics

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the fundamentals of genetic processes in bacteria (prokaryotes). The study of bacterial genetics has provided much of the understanding of fundamental genetic processes for all organisms, especially through the use of in vivo and in vitro genetic tools. Prokaryotic genetics is somewhat simpler than eukaryotic genetics due to the organization of the cell, its genome and transfer of genetic information. However, the basic concepts such as transcription, translation, mutation and recombination are similar if not identical in all organisms. The short generation time of bacteria lends themselves to genetic studies. Bacterial genetics labs are becoming easier to use, are relatively inexpensive and provide an ideal platform for genetic studies in the secondary school setting. This course will provide science teachers with the information necessary to understand the fundamental processes of genetics particularly as they apply to microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on the advances in microbial genetics and effects on technological and medical advances.

Major topics to be covered:

1.) Why study Prokaryotic genetics

2.) DNA and RNA
  • Bacterial chromosomes
  • Plasmids
  • Protection of DNA
3.) Mutations
  • DNA Repair
4.) Genetic recombination
  • Genetic transfer
  • Transformation
  • Conjugation
  • Bacteriophage
  • Transposable elements
5.) Gene Maps
  • Operons
  • Gene expression
6.) Current Research
  • Tools and protocols
  • World Wide Web Databases
7.) Issues
  • Genetically modified organisms (GMOs)
  • Technological advances
  • Controls and cautions


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MB 542: Microbial Ecology

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 23723
The objective of this course is to introduce educators and others to the complex world of Microbial Ecology. We will achieve this by exploring a wide range of topics within this subject area including the ecology of microorganisms in relation to nutrition, growth, metabolism, biogeochemical cycling, natural environments, and microbial interactions. This class relies on readings, literature and internet searches, active participation in discussions, online quizzes, a semester-long experiment, sharing approaches and materials, and culminates in a final presentation. Participants will have proxy online access to the Montana State University library.
You will be encouraged to dive in and investigate the various topics and make them relevant within your life, own classroom or work situation. We believe that you will develop an enduring interest into this fascinating realm of science.

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MB 547: Thermal Biology in Yellowstone National Park

Credits: 2

Co-listed as LRES 557, so teachers can choose from which department they want the credit awarded. Indicate your preference on the registration form.

This course will provide a survey of the ecology of important organisms common in thermal habitats of Yellowstone National Park, including a review of different life forms and the physical and chemical habitats that define their environment. The course is structured to provide (1) a basic understanding of the ecology of a variety of life forms in thermal habitats, (2) a survey of observational techniques and hands-on activities appropriate for science educators, and (3) a field trip to visit and characterize several geothermal habitats environments. Fundamental principles of thermal biology will be emphasized during lectures and methods of chemical, physical and biological analyses will be emphasized during the laboratory component while on the MSU campus. A two day field trip to Yellowstone National Park (that includes camping in the park) will include discussion, sampling and characterizing diverse geothermal habitats.

Course Outline:
1) Introduction: Ecology of Thermal Environments
2) Chemical and Physical Properties Important in Geothermal Systems
3) Microbial and Viral Diversity in Thermal Habitats
4) Fungi, Algae, and Plants; Eukaryotes in Thermal Environments
5) Field Experience: Observe, describe and characterize diverse geothermal environments.

Physical Fitness Requirement: Field trips will require walking distances of up to 5 miles with moderate slopes and will involve being in the field for the majority of the day. Weather may vary!

Transportation will be provided by MSU (vans) - no personal vehicles permitted (no exceptions).

Students are expected to provide the following minimum equipment for their camping needs:

  • Sleeping bag and pad (no bulky air mattresses), (We can provide these if needed).
  • Personal toiletries, sunglasses, hat, daypack, water bottle, sunscreen, camera, field notebook and pen, etc.
  • Clothing for hot and cold weather (warm hat and coat, shorts and sun hat).
  • Good hiking shoes (no open toed shoes).
  • Food for lunches (we will restock food supply while in Yellowstone).
  • Large coolers will be provided for perishable food.

Tents and sleeping pads will be provided. Students will need to bring a sleeping bag. Sleeping bags are available for rent at the ASMSU Outdoor Recreation department by visiting http://www.montana.edu/outdoorrecreation or by phone at (406) 994-3621.

Time Commitment: 10-12 hrs/day

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MB 591: Project Microbe

Credits: 1

This two day course will expose students to a range of microbiology topics and curriculum materials they can incorporate into their secondary science classroom. Students will experience the classroom activities, reflect on them, and discuss how these activities could be modified for their classroom and students. At the end of the course, students will present their modifications and share how they plan to use the curriculum materials and student activities. Topics will include: 1) the story of how the tree of life model changed over time and related concepts about the nature of science, 2) the scale and diversity of microbes, 3) constructing Winogradsky columns and modeling the nutrient cycling between microbes, 4) variety of microbes and their roles in and on the human body, and 5) effects of antibiotics on the human microbiome.

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NASX 530: Federal Indian Law and Policy

Credits: 3

Earn an on-line NAS Graduate Certificate http://eu.montana.edu/online/degrees/NatAm.htm

This course will cover some of the most important issues affecting American Indian lives and livelihoods, the histories of these issues from a legal perspective, and the generations of actors who have pursued and continue to pursue resolution of these issues through legal, legislative, and other means.

Syllabus

Please note that syllabus is tentative and subject to changes before course begins.


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Art and Literacy in the Science Classroom

Non-credit
See a video from the instructors here.

This course is designed to introduce educators to a unique methodology for teaching organized observation as a pathway to nonfiction writing in the science classroom.

Our methodology - a series of expository drawings and writings, readings and discussions – is based on the data-backed premise that teaching students the key skills involved in organized observation will improve their ability to build accuracy and detail in their drawing, which will lead to improved expository writing and scientific thinking skills.

Students in the course will:
  • Learn the key skills of organized observation
  • Learn about the anatomy, care, and life cycle of a flowering plant through a series of hands-on science modules
  • Build on new knowledge of organized observation to research and investigate an additional plant species
  • Communicate results of research and investigation through expository drawing and writing


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Next Generation of Science Standards For the Classroom

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) is a very comprehensive document, created by literally thousands of educators and scientists. But standards are not curriculum: They don’t guide science teachers on how to implement those standards in their classrooms. When schools adopt the NGSS, the work is just beginning. And, that work falls on the shoulders of curriculum developers and classroom teachers.

This online course for K-8 in-service teachers focuses on fundamental challenge of building specific classroom activities that align to NGSS. Participants will use grade-specific NGSS unit maps from NGSS bundles that group appropriate Performance Expectations (from the NGSS standards pages) to help them develop classroom activities for their particular classroom.

Participants will first learn how to “read” NGSS standards for their grade level and how to use the 5Es curriculum-building model to create their individual classroom experiences. The second part of the course will be building science classroom activities specially for their grade level teaching assignment. Teachers will be able to work individually or with small groups of teachers from the same grade level. The final product for this course is a usable 3-D NGSS classroom unit.

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Taking Next Generation Science Standards to your Classroom

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) is a very comprehensive document, created by literally thousands of educators and scientists. But standards are not curriculum: They don’t guide science teachers on how to implement those standards in their classrooms. When schools adopt the NGSS, the work is just beginning. And, that work falls on the shoulders of curriculum developers and classroom teachers.

This face-to-face workshop for K-8 in-service teachers focuses on the fundamental challenge of building specific classroom activities that align to NGSS. Participants will use grade-specific units that group appropriate Performance Expectations (from the NGSS standards pages) to help them develop classroom activities for their particular classroom.

Participants will first learn how to “read” NGSS standards for their grade level and how to use the 5Es curriculum model to build their individual classroom experiences. The second part of the workshop will be hands-on building of science classroom activities. Teachers will be able to work individually or with small groups of teachers from the same grade level.

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NUTR 526: Nutrition for Fitness and Performance

Credits: 3

CRN 34684

Nutrition is a key element in managing body weight and fueling physical fitness and athletic performance. Food provides fluids, energy, nutrients, fiber, and phytochemicals. But what nutritional strategies are optimal? Which dietary supplements work? Using nutrition to meet the demands of physical activity is a dynamic process that integrates scientific research, nutrition guidelines, and the practical aspects of fueling active people in specific situations.

This nutrition science course examines the latest developments that link nutrition with physical fitness, sport performance, and health promotion. Resources include a text, course supplement, nutrition analysis software, peer-reviewed scientific literature, current news, and Internet resources. Participants contribute to asynchronous online discussions throughout each week. Expect to relate each week's topic to your areas of interest and expertise. A diverse group of participants (practicing teachers in various specialties, coaches, athletic trainers, nutrition educators, and other health professionals) ensures that discussions are interesting, lively, and challenging. Topics include energy, fluid, and nutrient needs for physical activity; nutrition around exercise (before, during, recovery); free radicals and antioxidants; dietary supplements; body composition; weight management; disordered eating; and the female athlete triad. Sport-specific nutrition strategies for endurance, team sports, strength training, and muscle mass gain are addressed. Controversial issues such as popular diets, nutrient timing, and sports supplements are addressed. Internet resources are used extensively.

Assignments challenge participants to apply evidence-based nutrition strategies to practical situations. Participants demonstrate competency in the following areas: locating credible nutrition resources on the Internet; accessing, analyzing, and evaluating nutrition information; and using nutrition analysis software to plan meals, snacks, and a personalized fitness menu. The course project is a written evaluation of a dietary supplement, a popular diet, or a dietary regimen. Reference material is obtained from medical, health, and scientific sources such as published, peer-reviewed scientific literature accessed via the National Library of Medicine databases. Participants demonstrate competency in a written project that involves assessment, analysis, comparison, evaluation, and synthesis of information.

Note: This course was formerly HDFN 526: Nutrition for Fitness and Performance

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PHSX 401: Physics by Inquiry I

Credits: 3

Physics 401 is entirely laboratory based. Instead of absorbing facts from a lecture, the students make observations and build scientific models to account for their observations. The course emphasizes the development of basic concepts and reasoning skills, and efforts are made to actively engage students in the learning process. Staff-to-student ratio is of necessity high (two instructors for approximately 20 students), and interactions with staff are through Socratic dialog: the instructors do not give answers, but help the students find their own. Available computer technology is utilized as appropriate.

Physics 401 will begin with a series of activities/observations that will lead to the development of a scientific model for DC electric circuits. The students will be able to solve both qualitative and quantitative problems involving very complicated circuits containing batteries and bulbs. For example, they will be able to rank the brightness of the identical bulbs without relying on the rote use of equations.

The in-service teachers will also use shadow plots to develop a model for the relative motion of the earth and sun during the course of the semester. They will also make careful observations of the moon, and from their observations piece together a model to explain the phases of the moon.

The curriculum used will be the Physics by Inquiry modules developed by the Physics Education Group at University of Washington. This curriculum is based on two decades of research on student misconceptions. Each activity is designed to elicit those misconceptions known to block learning, and to allow the student to confront and resolve the difficulties. Students are often presented with several opportunities to confront the same misconception in increasingly rich contexts to insure that they are completely free of the misconception. This teaching approach has a three-fold advantage when used with future teachers:
  1. They come away from the class with a clear understanding of the physics based on their own experience.
  2. They acquire an awareness of those difficulties with which their future students are likely to be struggling.
  3. Most importantly, they acquire a self-confidence in their ability to do science, to face unknown situations and to find their own answers.
Their teaching will be free of references to higher authority. They will be able to predict the time of the high tide (a skill more useful in other states) by looking at the phase of the moon and using their model. And it will be their model because they will build it for themselves, from the ground up.

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PHSX 403: Physics by Inquiry III

Credits: 3

Physics 403 is a continuation of the Physics 401 experience, but it may also be taken concurrently with Physics 401. The course will begin with a careful investigation of geometrical optics, leading to an understanding of pinhole cameras, lenses, and prisms. This will be followed by an exploration of magnetic interactions and magnetic materials.

The curriculum used will be the Physics by Inquiry modules developed by the Physics Education Group at University of Washington. This curriculum is based on two decades of research on student misconceptions. Each activity is designed to elicit those misconceptions known to block learning, and to allow the student to confront and resolve the difficulties.

Physics 401 is either a prerequisite or a co-requisite for Physics 404.

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PHSX 405: Special Relativity

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 20805
This course approaches Einstein's theory of Special Relativity with a geometric perspective instead of through the Lorentz Transformations used in most introductory texts. There are two advantages to this approach:
  • 1) It leads to a more useful method for visualizing and solving problems in SR (Special Relativity) and with a modified Pythagorean Theorem and spacetime diagrams we can answer any question with confidence.
  • 2) Since geometry is the foundation for General Relativity (GR), this approach affords a seamless transition for students taking GR in the spring.
The first part of the course builds visualization and problem-solving techniques; then we demystify the various “paradoxes” in SR, which are really just naive questions rather than true paradoxes. Toward the end we explore the implications for energy and momentum conservation necessary for analyzing particle collisions at relativistic speeds.

Note: This course is a prerequisite for General Relativity, which is scheduled for spring semester 2018.

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PHSX 491: Conceptual Physics

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 10345
This course describes the workings of the world around us. The everyday: how a ball moves when it is thrown, the forces you feel on a roller-coaster, what happens when you turn on a light switch; and the esoteric: time and space from the perspective of Einstein's relativity, the basic structure of atoms and nuclei. The course is mostly at the conceptual level, with some simple algebraic problem solving. A unique feature of the class is a series of at-home experiments using simple materials to illustrate some basic ideas of physics.

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PHSX 511: Astronomy for Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11014
Astronomy has long been a subject that captures the imagination of young students and provides a framework for teaching many kinds of science. This course, specially designed for practicing science teachers at the middle and high school levels, serves as a survey of topics in astronomy, with special emphasis on the latest advances. The topics are closely aligned with the concepts emphasized in the NRC National Science Education Standards. Our textbook is a very complete, very up-to-date, very readable source that teachers will want to keep as a reference. Students are responsible for acquiring the textbook in time for the first day of class -- see below for details. Our instructional strategy focuses on readings from the textbook, exercises that clarify the concepts and collaborative internet group discussions that correct misunderstandings and deepen insights.

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PHSX 511: Astronomy for SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors

Credits: 3

Astronomy has long been a subject that captures the imagination of young students and provides a framework for teaching many kinds of science. This course, specially designed for NASA’s SOFIA Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors, serves as a survey of topics in astronomy, with special emphasis on the latest advances. Our textbook is a very complete, very up-to-date, and a very readable source that teachers will want to keep as a reference. Our instructional strategy focuses on readings from the textbook, exercises that clarify the concepts and collaborative internet group discussions that correct misunderstandings and deepen insights.

Our primary objective will be to prepare Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors for their SOFIA flights!

There is an option to take the course Pass/Fail. If you would like to pursue this option, in addition to registering for the course, you will need to download the Request for Pass/Fail Grade form and email or fax the completed form to Kelly Boyce at kboyce@montana.edu or fax it to his attention at (406) 994-6546. If you would prefer to use snail mail, send it to:
Attn: Kelly Boyce
Extended University
Montana State University
204 Culbertson Hall
Bozeman, MT 59717

If you plan to request to take the course Pass/Fail, after registering for the course, you will need to complete the request form and submit it before the 10th day of class.

Important: In order to pass the course using the Pass/Fail option, you will need to earn a grade of "C" or better. Anything below a "C" will be considered failing. In order to earn a "C" grade, you will need to participate fully and complete all requirements of the course. FYI, A course taken Pass/Fail will usually never count toward a degree program or a teaching endorsement, so this is something to consider in case you are thinking about using the course for one of these purposes.

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PHSX 512: General Relativity

Credits: 3

CRN 33809
What do we mean by "curved spacetime"? As you freely fall toward a black hole, how long does it take to reach the event horizon according to your watch? Can your friend at a safe distance actually see you cross the horizon? What happens at the horizon? Can you receive messages and packages from your friend on the outside? Can you send messages to your friend on the outside? How quickly will it be over at the central crunch point?

You can answer these questions for yourself with some math, starting from a simple formula, the "metric," for the black hole. You can also answer every possible question about trajectories of light and satellites around the black hole as well as around familiar centers of gravitational attraction such as the Earth and Sun. Also, there is the metric describing the entire universe. The metric tells us how the universe expands and ends.

SYLLABUS: The course begins by examining the idea of spacetime curvature and the Schwarzschild metric for a non-rotating black hole. With the metric we calculate the circumferences of circles in space around a large mass and find they do not match up with their radii in the usual way. As in special relativity, we find that observers disagree in startling ways, but general relativity even puts limits on our ability to construct reference frames in which to study these effects. We will calculate the consequence of spacetime curvature outside and inside a Schwarzschild black hole, Hawking radiation, and rotating black holes. We will learn the Big Bang, forms of energy driving the expansion of the universe, and cosmological models.

NOTE: Participants should have good math skills, especially in calculus. They should know how to find a maximum and a minimum of a function and should be able to integrate polynomial functions. Also, participants need to be familiar with quantization of light energy (Planck relation), Heisenberg uncertainty principle, time dilation, length contraction, relativistic energy, and other basic principles in modern physics. Some knowledge of astronomy would be helpful.

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PHSX 513: Quantum Mechanics

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 10317
Can quantum mechanics be made SIMPLE? What lies behind wave functions and Schrödinger’s wave equation? How is the microscopic world really put together? Can one explore the peculiar quantum world without resorting to complicated mathematical treatment?

In his popular little book, QED, The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, Richard Feynman reduces the rules of quantum mechanics to a simple command for the electron and the photon: Explore all paths. In 1948 Feynman proved that this command leads to all the same results as the usual quantum wave mechanics.

Our course studies the command "Explore all paths" and its consequences. Using hands-on software, you experiment with the quantum world illustrated in Feynman's book. You excise the rules of the quantum mechanics to explain real world observations. On the on-line forum, you discuss with other participants the deep paradoxes of quantum mechanics. But deep does not mean mathematical: NO EQUATIONS until one-third of the way through the course. Without needing equations, you watch the quantum wave function emerging as a natural consequence of the command "Explore all paths.

Some comments from teachers during previous semesters: "The reading was incredible...I really get a kick out of Feynman's totally off-wall way of describing this stuff...Truly a ground-breaker!...He brings up some REALLY interesting ideas that I am excited to discuss with the rest of the class...Feynman does a great job of explaining a post graduate physics topic in nearly everyday language...I enjoy reading him because he seems so honest about what he (and everyone else) does not know...Man, it made me feel good to read that Feynman couldn't understand this stuff either...I was very pleased to have Feynman tell us that what we will learn is absurd."

"This course is pretty addictive! I find myself constantly thinking of the concepts presented in the reading as well as the items brought up (in the on-line discussion)...I find it similar to a good novel. Hard to put down or out of my mind...I am learning SO MUCH from all of you. That's one of this course format's strongest features...I'm learning twice as much as I ever hoped to, and we have just scratched the surface...I got an A in my intro qm class without having even a fraction of the understanding I have now...I find the power of this weekly conferencing unmatched by any course or book I have read. This medium allows us all to resonate and reflect our views of Physics."

"As I breeze through Feynman, it occurs to me that the reading is easy because of the software simulations we have run...It is very nice to have these computer programs to "experiment" with...This all makes so much more sense now, and I owe a large part of that to the software."

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PHSX 514: Comparative Planetology: Establishing a Virtual Presence in the Solar System

Credits: 3

CRN 33810
Is there ice on Mercury? Why isn't Pluto a planet? As viewed by the modern astronomer, the Solar System includes more than 100 diverse worlds interacting as a dynamic system. This online course for K-12 in-service teachers focuses on fundamental questions driving NASA's exploration of the Solar System: How did it form? What's in it? How is it arranged? What does the study of other worlds (planets, moons, asteroids, and comets) teach us about our own? How do we learn about other worlds? How are these worlds similar and different? How do they interact, forming mini-systems within the Solar System? What are their surfaces, atmospheres, and interiors like, and how do we know? By taking advantage of NASA's virtual presence in the Solar System, course participants will learn about the "new" Solar System and how to engage their students in the wonder of exploration.

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PHSX 582: Astrobiology for Teachers

Credits: 3

CRN 34935
Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution, distribution, and destiny of life in the universe. It defines itself as an interdisciplinary science at the intersection of physics, astronomy, biology, geology, and mathematics, to discover where and under what conditions life can arise and exist in the Universe. The course topics will cover the discovery of planetary systems around other stars, the nature of habitable zones around distant stars, the existence of life in extreme environments. These concepts will serve as a foundation to study possible extraterrestrial ecosystems on places in the solar system like Mars and Europa. Students will also investigate the methods used in the ongoing search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) and search for Earth-like planets. The overarching theme of the course will be to help participants gain a fundamental conceptual understanding of the central topics of astrobiology and to empower teachers to bring these topics into their classroom by proving experiences using the instructional activities aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards, Framework for K-12 Education, and the NASA Astrobiology Strategy.

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PHSX 591: Electric Circuits & Magnetism

Credits: 2

Please register for CRN 11143
This 2-credit course is designed for practicing teachers who are teaching basic electric circuits as part of the science curricula in their classrooms. Its broad purpose is to introduce experienced teachers to core concepts in electric circuits, as those ideas relate to modern hands-on, inquiry-oriented science curricular materials. By helping teachers improve their understanding of the underlying physics, this course will enable them to teach electric circuits more effectively. The specific course goals are as follows:

  • To deepen teachers understanding of basic physics principles underlying electric circuits.
  • To enhance teachers ability to convey concepts of electric circuits through inquiry approaches to learning.
  •  To encourage the sharing of resources and pedagogical methods among course participants.
  • To strengthen teacher knowledge and confidence in teaching electric circuits, and to develop their ability to critically analyze and use commercially available resources.
  • To briefly introduce magnetism, differentiating electric charge and magnet poles and observing the connection between an electric current and a magnetic field.

This course will be taught as an online, D2L-based course. The course involves significant student/instructor and student/student interaction with extensive participation in online discussion of laboratory work, assigned reading, homework assignments, and independent study utilizing targeted Internet searches. The time commitment is anticipated to be approximately 11-13  hours per week for seven weeks. Course work will involve a mixture of online discussion, hands-on (lab-type) activities, readings from assigned and independently researched sources, and on-line quizzes.



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PHSX 591: Teaching and Learning in Science: Elementary Space Science

Credits: 1

Please register for CRN 22552
The Sun rises, the Sun sets. There must be more to life than that.

There is. The patterns of day and night - of the Sun, Moon, planets, and stars - are complex and wonderful. Some are very easy to figure out if you have the right tools; others take a bit of practice. All can be studied at different levels, and so can be used for different grade levels and for the focus of scientific inquiry.

This course is intended for elementary school teachers who use hands-on curricula. The topics include the Moon and lunar phases, patterns and changes in the night sky, the Sun’s appearance over the day and over the year at different locations on Earth, and some keys to understanding the surface patterns of planets and other worlds in our Solar System. Throughout the course are ways of learning about student ideas, limitations, and misconceptions. Each week, participants work through a selection of activities and contribute to asynchronous online discussions. The available activities focus on each week’s topic, but each participant is encouraged to choose activities that will best contribute to her or his own learning and teaching needs. Many of the activities parallel student activities in popular space science curriculum kits, though most are geared for adult learners. At the same time, participants experience a long-term observation-based inquiry. Discussions provide a way for participants to learn about a wide assortment of activities, exchange tips and ideas, and bounce thoughts and questions off colleagues as they work through their own understandings.

Participants examine and deepen their own understanding of space science, uncover and correct misunderstandings, and explore different ways of learning particular topics. In doing so, participants gain skills to support inquiry-based learning and guided kit use among their students. Resources include a Teacher’s Guide, star wheel, and access to templates participants and their students can use to make tools to understand space science. Internet resources are used throughout the course. Activities use household materials.

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PHSX 591: The Science of Sound

Credits: 1

CRN 34206
In this exciting seven-week online course we will investigate principles of Sound. Conducting and observing hands-on, “ears-on” science is easy and fun! You will record the principles you learn in a science notebook and share your investigations with other teachers through collaborative assignments and weekly discussions. This is a course that allows you to play as you learn.


By participating in this course, you will...
  • Have a clearer conceptual understanding of how sound works and what it is.
  • Know how to examine sounds by looking at the whole "sound system" (force vibration, medium, receiver).
  • Learn about sound energy and how it moves through a medium.
  • Examine how the properties of materials affect the sounds you hear.
  • Learn about ears and how they work.
  • Experience the true Scientific Method and collaboration.

This is a conceptual physics course that is designed especially for Elementary teachers with little or no formal training in science. Teachers with significant previous experience teaching physical science are welcome, but are encouraged to contact NTEN for more information.

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PHSX 591: Physics of Renewable Energy for Secondary Teachers

Credits: 3

Please register for CRN 11013

This course is intended to provide secondary physics teachers with a connection between topics in renewable energy sources to Next Generation Science Standards in physics. The goal of the course is to improve their pedagogical knowledge related to teaching the physics associated with renewable energy sources. Students will focus on developing classroom materials related to the subject.

During this online course, participants will complete a series of online units centered on bringing the physics of renewable energy sources into a high school physics classroom. Students will develop an understanding of the underlying physics associated with renewable energy sources. As this course is intended for secondary classroom teachers, instruction will place an emphasis on creating classroom materials appropriate for secondary science classrooms and consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards. Energy sources covered include power derived from nuclear fusion/fission, wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, hydrogen, biomass and water waves. World energy consumption and energy storage will also be covered.

    Objectives - Secondary physics teachers who successfully complete this course will be able to do the following:
  • 1. Describe the current and projected world energy usage.
  • 2. Describe the necessity of renewable energy sources.
  • 3. Explain how energy is obtained from various renewable energy sources covered in the course.
  • 4. Demonstrate mastery of underlying physics concepts utilized in renewable energy sources covered in the course.
  • 5. Identify Next Generation Science Standards associated with topics in renewable energy.
  • 6. Show the ability to encorporate the underlying physics of renewable energy sources into the teaching of introductory level physics.
Restricted to secondary physics teachers.

Syllabus (PDF) | Syllabus (.docx)



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PHSX 591: Teaching Electricity and Magnetism Using Research-Based Curriculum

Credits: 2

Many science teachers feel more comfortable teaching mechanics than the more abstract concepts of electricity and magnetism. This is unfortunate, as the application of these principles can be so much more exciting that the block-down-the-inclined-plane types of problems treated in mechanics. Students can be taught how to wire their own home or build electric motors.

This five-day course uses essentially the same mode as in "Teaching Mechanics Using Research-Based Curriculum", except that the topics covered will come from the second semester of the typical introductory physics sequence. Participants will learn how to teach an integrated course built around Tutorials in Introductory Physics (McDermott, et al.). This research-based curriculum challenges students to confront their misconceptions and build gut-level models of the key concepts of electricity and magnetism. The course will showcase both the student-centered tutorial instruction and the supporting active-engagement PowerPoint lectures. We will also review the physics education research literature that provides the foundation for these curricular materials.

Participants will receive 70 PowerPoint lectures, each with its own description and learning outcomes, designed to engage the students in active learning and provide the necessary links to the Tutorial experience. A complete description of supporting demonstrations will also be provided. Finally, participants will receive a large bank of research-based homework and exam questions designed specifically to elicit the common misconceptions addressed in the Tutorials.

Time Commitment: 8-10 hrs/day

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PHSX 591: The World of Motion

Credits: 1

Please register for CRN 11147

In this 6-week course for elementary teachers we will focus on the core ideas of measurement and motion, as they appear in modern inquiry-oriented science education. The course aims to help teachers use modern curricular materials more effectively by increasing their understanding of the physics concepts.

The specific course goals are to:

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the concepts central to a description of motion. These include position, time, displacement, velocity and acceleration.
  • Learn how to describe motion graphically and using data tables, and develop an understanding of the connections between these representations and the fundamental ideas of motion
  • Study how children's concepts of motion are developed in the classroom setting, and thereby become more effective users of inquiry-based curricular materials in teaching about motion
  • Develop our own professional community of course participants, sharing teaching ideas, expertise and experience


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PHSX 591: World of Force

Credits: 1

Please register for CRN 11383

This 1-credit course is designed for 4-8 grade teachers who are exploring the concepts of forces in their classrooms. Its broad purpose is to introduce elementary and middle school teachers to core ideas about forces, as they relate to modern hands-on, inquiry-oriented science curricular materials. The course aims to help teachers use such materials more effectively by increasing their understanding of physics concepts, especially as those concepts may emerge in a classroom engaged in hands-on active learning. It is not a course in how to use a particular curriculum. The goals of this course are to...

  • Gain a thorough understanding of the concept of force and the different kinds of force
  • Develop expertise in representing forces with free-body diagrams
  • Gain a thorough understanding of the relationship between forces and Newton's three laws of motion
  • Understand how forces determine the conditions for balancing
  • Learn how forces explain the operation of simple machines such as pulleys and levers
  • Study how children's concepts of force, torque, and work are developed in classroom settings
  • Become more effective users of inquiry-based curricular materials in teaching about forces
  • Develop your own professional community of course participants, with whom you can share teaching ideas, expertise, and experience.


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PSPP 548: Flowering Plants of the Northern Rocky Mountains

Credits: 2

A field oriented study of the flowering plants of Montana with an emphasis on plant keying skills.

Objectives are:
  • to identify the parts of flowering plants and become familiar with botanical terms
  • to learn morphological characteristics of common plant families
  • to learn how to use a plant key to successfully identify flowering plants
  • to apply plant identification skills to the classroom
Discussion will emphasize application of these skills and botanical texts to the classroom.

Physical Fitness Requirement:
Field trips require walking up to 2 miles on moderate slopes.

Equipment List for Flowering Plants of the Northern Rocky Mountains.
You will be provided:
  • small plastic metric ruler
  • 10x plant lens
  • set of handouts
Time Commitment: 8-10 hrs/day

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PSPP 591: Plants, People, and Health

Credits: 2

This interdisciplinary course investigates how plants and people intersect, with a focus on the current popular and scientific interest in using plants and their compounds for health and medicine. The subject will be applied to ethnobotany, botany, and phytochemistry. Enhancing the links between the natural world and the classroom can bring meaning to all the science and instill an interest in the investigation of plants and their uses. The course will have the following components:
  • Application to Ethnobotany: relationships between people, flora, and environment.
  • Application to Botany: plant defense, co-evolution, chemical communication.
  • Application to Phytochemistry: plant biosynthetic pathways for secondary compounds and classes of plant compounds.
  • Application to Chemistry: making herbal products from plant material.
Laboratory: The last day will be spent with hands-on experience making some herbal products to enhance the learning opportunity.

Instructor: The instructor has 20 years experience in teaching the above topics and is both a traditional herbalist (American Herbalist Guild) and a medical botanist (M.S.).

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EDCI 545: Organization of Information in School Library Media Centers

Credits: 3

This course introduces prospective and practicing school librarians to the principles of cataloging and classification of books and multimedia materials; to OPACs (Online Public Access Catalogs); and to the intellectual importance and challenges of deciding where our books and library materials go, why they go there, and how we can support students' discovery of them. The course can help lead to a certificate in School Library Media from Montana State University

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EDCI 546: The School Library Media Specialist

Credits: 3

As part of the Library Media program, this course will examine the management, administration, leadership and instructional roles of the school library media specialist and how the library media center fits into the educational setting. As an overview of the profession, this is a required course for teachers pursuing school library media certification. It may also be used for recertification by practicing school library media specialists.

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EDCI 547: Information Inquiry and Educational Change

Credits: 3

As part of the Library Media program, this course examines information literacy as a core, requisite skill for students in today’s world. Geared for prospective school library media specialists, cross-curricular collaboration and Common Core requirements will be the central focus. This course will also examine the impact of digital technology on the educational environment. Included are topics affecting change in libraries and education such as: filtering, censorship, digital ethics, new technologies and other topics as relevant to inquiry and integration.

GOALS
  • To understand the role of “information literacy” as an essential skill for today’s students and a cornerstone of a meaningful curriculum
  • To develop collaboration strategies and skills to facilitate a meaningful incorporation of information literacy skills in content areas
  • To understand current state and national standards for library media and classroom curriculum as they relate to information literacy
  • To understand the special challenges inherent in information delivery today, especially open source information and changing formats
  • To understand inquiry/information processing models, such as the Big6 and develop skill in infusing them into the curriculum
  • To explore issues inherent in our digital society
  • To gain awareness of contemporary forces and issues shaping education and the need to adapt curriculum to these forces
  • To understand how Common Core Standards will impact and shape all aspects of K-12 education and to be able to develop and implement supportive strategies


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EDCI 548: Management of Information and Resources

Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to examine the principles and explore alternative approaches to the management, development, use, and evaluation of library collections in school library media centers. We will examine issues and trends that affect the collection and services. Emphasis will also be placed on intellectual freedom, curricular involvement and outside resources for collection sharing and development.

Goals:
  • To introduce the principles and techniques of collection development, assessment, and management
  • To recognize the problems and challenges of collection development and management including access, as well as legal issues about copyright and intellectual freedom
  • To begin to develop practical methods and techniques for solving problems of collection development and management
  • To develop understanding of opportunities and challenges posed by electronic materials
  • To introduce the major issues pertaining to collection development and managemnet as pertinent to school library media centers


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EDCI 598: Internship in Library Media

Credits: 3

An individualized assignment arranged with a school or public library to provide guided experience in the school library media field. Students are responsible for locating an assignment, clearing it with Nora Martin and registering for the course and participating in the Desire2Learn environment. Approximately 45 hours will be spent in a library setting. Desire2Learn will be used for content, assignments, discussions and postings. The online part of EdCi 598 is only offered during summer semesters.

Practicum/Internship is restricted to students in the School Library Media Certification Program. Paperwork is required prior to beginning class. Contact Nora Martin at hermitwanabe@gmail.com by April 15, 2015 if you plan to take the EdCi 598 class to receive the forms.

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SPNS 250: Spanish for Healthcare Professionals

Credits: 3

Please note: You will not see a registration option for this class on the registration page as this class is closed.

This course will provide healthcare industry professionals and students with a foundation to work and converse with Spanish-speaking patients. Students in the course will develop cultural competency of Latino medical issues in and outside of the United States and apply specifically-targeted sets of Spanish vocabulary/grammar to medical conversation. Students will learn the basics of interviewing in Spanish, participate in a real-world learning experience and discuss articles focused on healthcare in Latin America and the United States.

There is a minimum enrollment for this course and if not met, the course may be cancelled and fees fully refunded.

For complete information on administrative policies http://eu.montana.edu/credit/policy.htm

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AC 501: Chemical Dependency Counseling

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Program to take this course **

This course will provide an overall introduction to addiction counseling. The class will also provide an introduction to the assessment and treatment of alcoholism and other chemical dependencies, with emphasis on the application of specific clinical strategies to this specialized problem area. Since substance abuse may underlie or coexist with a variety of other problems, including family violence, mental illness, health issues, etc., the mental health professional trained in the assessment and treatment of chemical dependency will be better able to assess and intervene appropriately.

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AC 502: Psychopharmacology and Addictions

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Program to take this course **

This course examines medications that are commonly prescribed for psychiatric disabilities; descriptions of medication effects, interaction, and side effects.

There are 2 sections to this course.
Section 801 is taught by Shelby Frye.
Section 802 is taught by Glee Dunbar.


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AC 503: Assessment, Treatment Planning of Addiction Counseling

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate Program to take this course **

Formerly known as LAC 503

Please use CRN 24986 to register

This course is designed to examine the psychological, behavioral, sociological, and cultural underpinnings in the assessment and treatment of clients affected by addictions. The course explores a variety of helping strategies for reducing the negative effects of substance use, abuse, dependence, and addictive disorders (CACREP, Section III, C.5.). Ethical issues related to the field of Addictions Counseling will also be explored.

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AC 504: Alcohol and Drug Studies

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate Program to take this course **

Formerly known as LAC 504

Please use CRN 24987 to register

This course is designed to offer in-depth exploration of alcohol and drug studies. Students will integrate information learned from previous addictions courses with cutting edge research within the field of addictions as it pertains to a particular population or topic specific to addiction counseling.

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AC 505: Cross-Cultural & Ethical Considerations in Addictions Counseling

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate Program to take this course **

Formerly known as LAC 505

Please use CRN 11414 to register

This course is designed to examine cultural and ethical constructs related to addictions counseling. This course will focus on current literature, theories, approaches, strategies, and techniques shown to be effective when working with populations of clients with addictions. Furthermore, this course will explore public policies that affect quality and accessibility of mental health services as well as learn about effective strategies to support client advocacy and influence policy implementation or change, when necessary (CACREP, III. E). Legal and ethical considerations specific to the field of Addictions Counseling will also be explored throughout this course. (CACREP, III, A.2). In particular, students will develop and practice ethical decision making skills via case vignettes thus demonstrating their ability to apply and adhere to ethical and legal standards in addiction counseling (CACREP, III, B.1).

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AC 506: Group Counseling in Addiction Settings

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate program to take this course**

Formerly known as LAC 506

Please use CRN 24988 to register

This course will provide students with the foundational concepts of group counseling as it relates to the addiction settings. Topics will include group development theory, membership roles, establishing an alliance, skills of group, multicultural issues, leadership styles and skills.

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AC 507: Group Counseling in Addiction Settings II

Credits: 3

*You must apply to the Addiction Counseling Program to take this course.*

This course will build upon material presented in LAC 506 with greater emphasis on group work in an addictions setting. Topics will include motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral technique in group work.

As a result of this course, students will demonstrate the following:

  • Ability to utilize motivational techniques in a group setting.
  • Ability to utilize cognitive behavioral techniques from an addictions perspective in a group experience.
  • Knowledge of challenging client situations and how to best deal with those situations.
  • Knowledge of assessments to utilize in a group context.
  • Ability to apply and use knowledge gained in Group Counseling in Addictions Settings I.


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AC 508: Counseling Theories in Addiction Settings

Credits: 3

**You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate program to take this course**

Formerly known as LAC 508

Please use CRN 11415 to register

This course examines multiple counseling theories and their application in the addictions setting. Development across the lifespan and theoretical approaches specific to addiction will also be examined.

Course Goals:
As a result of this course, students will demonstrate the following:

  • Knowledge of Rational-Emotive-Behavioral Theory
  • Knowledge of Behavioral Modification Theory
  • Knowledge of Control/Reality Theory
  • Knowledge of Person-centered Theory
  • Knowledge of Psychoanalytic Theory
  • Knowledge of Adlerian Individual Theory
  • Knowledge of Gestalt Theory
  • Knowledge of Solution-Focused Therapy
  • Knowledge of Motivational Enhancement Therapy
  • Ability to apply general principals of counseling theories and family systems approaches to addiction counseling.
  • Identification and review of the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous
  • Ability to explore and identify the relationship between substance abuse and domestic violence
  • Knowledge of cognitive, physical, social and emotional developmental theory and stages across the lifespan.


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    AC 509: Assessment & Treatment Planning in Addictions II

    Credits: 3

    **You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Program to take this course **

    This course covers addiction assessment and patient placement, including the American Society of Addiction Medicine Patient Placement Criteria. Treatment planning and documentation specific to the addiction field will be covered. This course is designed to examine the psychological, behavioral, sociological, and cultural underpinnings in the assessment and treatment of clients affected by addictions. The course explores a variety of helping strategies for reducing the negative effects of substance use, abuse, dependence, and addictive disorders.

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    AC 510: Chemical Dependency Counseling II

    Credits: 3

    **You must apply to be in the Addiction Counseling Certificate Program to take this course **

    Formerly known as LAC 510

    Please use CRN 24989 to register

    This course is designed for students who have already obtained an undergraduate degree in psychology or sociology and wish to obtain additional certification in the addiction counseling field. This course provides the chemical dependency counseling content required by the state of Montana for licensure as an Addictions Counselor. This course will provide instruction on chemical dependency counseling and addiction, with emphasis on specific clinical strategies in this specialized problem area. Substance abuse may underlie or co-exist with a variety of other problems- the mental health professional trained in comprehensive understanding of addiction/dependency will be better able to assess, intervene and counsel clients appropriately.

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